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Vermont Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING

 

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Deer*Turkey*Bear*Moose
 
Picket Hill Guide Service
Ph 802-442-2317
          
Welcome to Pickett Hill Guide Service, located at the foothills of the Green Mountain National Forest in Bennington, Vermont. We are here to bring you closer to nature. Whether you are a seasoned hunter or have not once stepped foot into the woods, we promise to provide you with a unique and enriching experience. Nobody knows Southern Vermont and the surrounding area better than we do. Let us know what activity you want to do and we will guide you to the appropriate location. From there, our expertise in tracking, hunting, and fishing will lend a valuable hand in making your Vermont outdoors experience as memorable as it can be!  If hunting is what you want, hunting is what you will get! Our hunting areas support trophy game of all varieties. Deer, bear, moose, turkeys and coyotes are all thriving in our select hunting locations. All hunts provide you with a prime location for getting the game you are after. All persons attending a hunt must possess a valid Vermont state hunting license. All Children must possess a hunter safety course certificate and license as well. Hunts can be reserved for up to six people.
 
Elk*Boar*Stag*Buffalo*Deer
Wild Hill Preserve
646 Preserve Road
Fairlee, VT 05045
Ph 802-333-4179
           
Your host and guide is Bill Richter, one of the most experienced outdoorsmen in America. He has devoted a lifetime to his craft in Alaska, Canada and South America as a hunter, trapper, guide and bush pilot. He developed Wild Hill especially for the sportsman who expects something more from his hunt. By traveling a relatively short distance from home, a hunter can leave everyday cares behind and coexist with nature, testing his skills against his game in a true wilderness setting. Bill's knowledge and experience will assure you of an exciting and memorable hunt. Elk are perhaps the most impressive antlered animals on earth. Our Elk come from some of the best blood in the world. We have beautiful, large-bodied, heavy-antlerered Elk. You simply will not find our caliber of Elk anywhere else and our prices are unbeatable. Why pay thousands to go out west for a trophy bull just to come out empty-handed or with a cow? We guarantee a shot at a magnificient bull elk worthy of any trophy room. If you do not tag-out, you only pay room and board. Elk are hunted beginning in September into January. The popularity of Buffalo hunts continues to grow at Wild Hill. Magnificient and awe-inspiring; they are truly a sight to behold. Higher in protein and lower in fat and cholesterol, Buffalo meat offers a healthier alternative to beef. Buffalo are hunted in both spring and fall.
Bear*Moose*Turkey
Ammonoosuc River Outfitters
Pat Rayta
18 Hooker ave.
Barre, VT 05641
Ph 802 476 3048
Hello, my name is Pat Rayta of Ammonoosuc River Outfitters. I have been hunting the woods of Vermont since 1983, and guiding in New Hampshire for the past four years. I am the ONLY certified Guide operating in both Vermont and New Hampshire that I am aware of that once again can offer a bear hunt in both states. I have well established bait sites in New Hampshire, and hunt both natural foods and seasonal crops in Vermont. I offer moose hunts in both states as well, and I love hunting turkeys. I have been fortunate enough to take animals in both states that have been able to be recorded in the record books for each state. There are many family activities to do locally while you enjoy your hunt too. Airport pick up can be arranged, and Montreal is but a few hours away. Shopping in tax free New Hampshire is the way to go when gift shopping for those that didn't come with you. Check us out on Facebook, Ammonoosuc River Outfitters today! 
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Vermont Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

  By the 1930's the white-tailed deer population was once again well established in Vermont.  Today the deer is a valuable and popular game animal.  There are an estimated 160,000 deer in Vermont.  We have learned a great deal over the last 100 years about helping the deer herd in Vermont to stay healthy.   A full-grown deer is about three feet tall at the shoulder.  A buck weighs up to 300 pounds and a doe weighs about 140 pounds.  Their coats are reddish-brown in the summer and grayish in the winter.  Their coats also grow thicker in the winter.  They raise their white tail as a warning of danger when they turn and run away. A doe usually gives birth to one or two fawns in the spring.  A fawn is spotted so it blends with the surrounding vegetation, and it has little scent.  This way the fawn is protected from predators. White-tailed deer browse on twigs, buds, acorns, grass, and wild apples.  Their preferred habitat is the forest, swamps, and open brush areas.  They also move to find protected areas during bad weather. A white-tailed deer depends on its senses of smell, sight, and hearing to be warned of danger.  If it is frightened, deer can run up to 35 miles per hour. Deer in poor habitat will not only appear thin, but have small antlers as well. Unlike horns of cattle, antlers are not a permanent part of a male deer's body. In, Pennsylvania bucks typically shed or drop their antlers in December and January, following the fall breeding season. Hearing, sight, and smell are well developed in the white-tailed deer as any hunter will verify. Individually these senses are impressive; in combination they go a long way in helping deer survive. Hearing is used to identify the presence of other animals, including human beings, nearby. Smell is also used for this purpose and to help the deer select food. The whitetail deer eyes are set to the side of its head allowing it to see almost all the way around its body. Whitetails prefer an area with diverse food and cover types, including mixed-aged timber stands. Ideal habitat will provide a mixture of forest, brush land, and cropland in blocks of one to two square miles. Deer in Vermont eat a wide variety of items; among them are: wild crabapple, corn, sumac, Japanese honeysuckle, grasses, greenbriar, clover, soybeans, jewelweed, acorns, dogwoods, and miscellaneous woody plants.

 


Vermont Hunting Outfitters and Guides Moose Facts

The. Vermont moose population is relatively stable at around 3,000 animals Moose have been absent from the state from the early 1700's. As recently as the 1970's a moose sighting was considered a rare sight. Why are moose here now? As early settlers cleared the extensive forests in the state for pastures and farming, moose habitat disappeared and so did the moose. This was a trend through much of New England. Habitat for moose recovered due in part to farmers moving out to the more fertile Midwest or to factories during the Industrial Revolution. Moose are now reclaiming their former range and moving into areas where they haven't been seen for hundreds of years. Moose populations got a boost in northern New England states from a combination of forest cutting practices and lack of moose harvest which created ideal moose habitat and allowed for high reproduction and survival rates.


Vermont Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

Vermont Bear population is an estimated 3.500 and 4,500. If you do encounter a bear, stay at a distance and holler at it. Don't get closer to the bear and stay indoors, if possible, while you continue shouting at the animal. Bear, like other animals don't attack unless they are threatened, so don't pursue the bear. A bear will roam over 10-20 square miles. Black bears are very agile, can run up to 35 mph, climb trees and swim well. They may live up to 25 years in the wild, although few do. Black bear are intelligent and curious. Studies show bear can see colors, recognize human forms, and notice even the slightest movement. However, bear usually rely on their acute sense of smell and, to a lesser degree, hearing to locate food and warn them of danger. Despite their common name, black bear are not always black. They may be cinnamon-colored, blond or black. Often they have a white spot or on their chest. Black bear appear heavy and have short, powerful legs. Adults usually weigh from 200 to 600 pounds, with rare individuals weighing up to 900 pounds. Males are called boars; females, sows. An adult male normally weighs more than an adult sow, sometimes twice as much. Bear tracks are distinctive. The hind footprint resembles a human's. Bear have five toes. The front foot is shorter than the rear, which is long and narrow. Claw marks may or may not be visible. Bear use trails just as people do. Look for tracks in soft earth or around mud puddles. Watch for claw marks on smooth-barked trees or rotten logs that have been ripped apart for insects. It's also easy to recognize a black bear sizable droppings of partly-digested berries, corn or animal hair. Adult black bear make a variety of sounds that include woofing, growls and jaw-popping. Sows communicate with their cubs by using low grunts or huffs. Cubs whimper, chuckle and bawl.

 


Vermont Hunting Outfitters and Guides Turkey Facts

The Vermont turkey population has expanded today to approximately 45,000 to 50,000 birds. Turkey beards are actually comprised of bristles or filaments that appear to be hair-like modified feathers known as mesofiloplumes. The individual bristles emerge from a single follicle or papillae and the number of bristles in the beard varies. Unlike feathers, beards are not molted each year. Turkey Beards grow at the rate of 3 to 5 inches per year but the length of the beard is limited because the end is worn as the turkey feeds in snow or even on dry ground. Beards exceeding 10 or 11 inches in length are uncommon in the northeast. The average life expectancy of a wild turkey is about three years. Some turkey live much longer, but most wild turkey die young. The record for a banded hen in the wild is about 13 years. Turkey have a crop, an enlargement of the esophagus in the neck area, where food is temporarily stored. Not all birds have crops; many seed eating songbirds, ducks and geese have no true crop. It is a special adaptation in birds that need to swallow large amounts of whole foods in a hurry, much faster than the stomach can accommodate, like whole acorns. The crop of the turkey is rather large, allowing a large gobbler to eat a pound of food at one meal. A hen turkey lays an egg nearly every day until her nest contains 8-15 (average, 12; smaller clutches by younger birds), but won't begin incubating constantly until after all eggs are laid. The wild turkey species is, by nature, a flocking and social species. Being such, flocks maintain home ranges and recognize individual animals within each flock. They establish a 'pecking order' (like chickens) with dominant & subordinate individuals; dominant individuals will peck at or chase subordinates, especially away from food sources.
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