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HUNTING

 

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FISHING



FlyFishing*Bonefish
Travel Adventures-Los Roques
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Phone 585-360-1812

EMAIL WEBSITE

Los Roques Archipelago, which lies 80 miles off Venezuela’s mainland, along the Caribbean Sea, is considered among the best bonefishing places in the World. The Archipelago consists of forty-eight keys or islands; when overlooked from a plane, the sight is like a string of pearls against the azure blue of the Caribbean. Los Roques has been appointed a National Park, and no new building can be constructed on the islands. Long-line fishermen have been forbidden and other kinds of fishing has been restricted. As a result, the amount of fish dwelling in the Archipelago has increased steadily, while other types of game fish have emerged into these protected waters, like big tarpons up to 80lb. (and even 100lb.) Big permit and enormous snook to 20lb. have been hooked and released.  No matter how one fishes for bonefish, perhaps the most challenging way is to wade the flats, spot feeding fish, creep slowly within casting distance and then make a presentation. If the fish is not startled, it will most likely pick up the fly, and within seconds, the angler is hooked to a miniature-size Express train. Regardless of their size, bonefish can strip more line than any other fish of comparable size

FlyFishing
Travel Adventures-Tarpon Village
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Phone 585-360-1812

EMAIL WEBSITE
While some fishermen search the world's waters for giant tarpon, those that weigh well over 100 pounds, perhaps even more anglers look for areas where schools of small tarpon are found. Their reason is sound. First of all, it is not as tiring to land a small tarpon as it is to land a giant. Secondly, the sporting challenge is preserved by using fly rod and reel. And finally, these anglers prefer to catch many fish.  The Lagoon harbors a remarkable tarpon fishery. Protected from commercial fishing since the turn of the 20th century, and separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a strip-shaped beach and larger lakes, and because of its richness in forage fish and other foods, it is an ideal habitat for small tarpon and Snook. Most of the tarpon range from five to ten pounds. There are also bigger tarpon, from ten to thirty pounds. Occasionally a person hooks a trophy of over fifty pounds, which turns the challenge from exciting into a spectacle. New sixteen-feet boats powered by outboard motors, casting platforms, swivel chairs and rod holders, skippered by native guides, will take you to the tarpon grounds. You typically begin casting the mangrove pockets with a fly; surface flies will often work, and a strike on top water is a great thrill. Two anglers, a guide and a boatman occupy each boat.








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