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Ohio Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING

 

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Deer*Turkey
Oak Ridge Whitetail Adventures
Sam and Sonya Holley
7143 Noble Rd
Windsor, OH 44099
Ph 440-636-3040
          

All hunts include up to three days, one-on-one guide service up to two hunters and one-on-two for three or more hunters, enclosed or open tree stands, transportation to and from stands, retrieval of game to the lodge, and preparing animal for transportation.We book 1-4 hunters per group and only one group at a time. You will be the only hunters on property for the duration of your hunt. Every effort will be made to ensure that you have a successful and memorable hunt. We can add non-hunting guest to enjoy your hunting experience at a rate of $100 per hunt.Other services that can be arranged include taxidermy, meat processing and shipping.We do have handicapped stand access and will cater a hunt to meet special needs that may be required. Here at Oak Ridge Whitetail Adventures, we are a premier Ohio deer hunting outfitter. Our hunting preserve is all natural land and is well populated with whitetail deer. Our whitetail hunting preserve is located in the rolling hills of Ashtabula County, Ohio. Are you looking for the ultimate deer hunting excursion? Ohio is among the areas that have the highest population of whitetail deer so hunting in Ohio is simply the best. If you're looking for whitetail deer hunting in Ohio, contact Oak Ridge Whitetail Adventures today. We have all of the knowledge and experience to provide you with the best hunting experience ever.
 
Deer*Turkey
Big Buck Down Outfitters
Jason McCleary
Ph 330-844-6625
           
Welcome to Big Buck Down Outfitters of Ohio. My name is Jason McCleary and I am the owner/operator of Big Buck Down Outfitters of Ohio. We are a new outfitter and are located in Tuscarawas, Coshocton, & Vinton Counties. We currently lease over 4,500 private acres, which have been under our management program for the past three years. Our properties offer all types of hunting environments from hardwoods, thickets, winter wheat fields, soybean fields to CRP fields. We have also added food plots, supplemental feed stations and a variety of mineral licks throughout our properties. Big Buck Down Outfitters of Ohio takes a limited number of hunters each year to ensure low hunting pressure and so we can continue to harvest mature trophy whitetails. If you are looking for a quality guided hunt you've come to the right place. We specialize in White Tail Trophy Deer and Wild Turkey on over 3200 acres of Ohio back country. We offer fully guided or semi guided hunts. Our Deer Hunts are considered "Trophy Hunts". Our guides spend countless hours each and every year scouting mature whitetails to give our clients the best chance of harvesting a mature Ohio whitetail.
 
Deer*Turkey
Whitetail Outfitters of Ohio
Ty McCombs
13659 Pinewood Tr.
Newark, OH 43055
Ph 740-745-1348
            
 

We have over 6000 acres leased in Licking, Muskingum and Coshocton counties here in Ohio. These are the three top trophy deer (140+ class) counties in the State of Ohio. Our leases are on the highest quality private land that is a mixture of hardwoods, corn, soybean, and alfalfa fields. Our deer and turkey have plenty to eat. We have no fences; all our hunting is fair chase. In the summer time, we film groups of 5 to 6 Pope and Young bucks feeding together in our fields. This area is known for it's non-typical deer. We offer quality, fully guided whitetail and semi-guided turkey hunts. Home cooked meals and lodging are included in the fees for the whitetail hunts. Meals and lodging are not available at this time for turkey hunts. We also provide transportation to and from the Columbus Airport. We have incorporated one scenting system here at Whitetail Outfitters of Ohio for our customers. We condition our deer to scrape where we want them to . We start making mock scrapes using these products in August and the bucks take them over. It is not uncommon for our bucks to start scraping here by the middle of September, well before the rut.  Our deer are scouted daily at long distance using binoculars so we can keep you in hot, productive stands. Ohio non-resident deer tags cost $125.00 and an additional deer tag costs $24.00.  Ohio Deer Hunting Regulations permit multiple deer tags for that season. Turkey license and permits are $91.00 for non-resident hunting license and $20.00 for a turkey permit. An additional turkey permit may be purchased for $20.00.

Deer*Turkey
Sunfish Valley Whitetail
Matt Brewster
4769 State Route 124
Latham, OH 45646
Ph 740-222-8906
           
Sunfish Valley Whitetails is located in south central Ohio, in the counties of Pike, Adams, Highland, Ross and Scioto. The majority of the property we are currently using is in Pike County. We own over 15,000 acres of land in south central Ohio. We offer the hardcore, serious bow hunter a legitimate chance to harvest a trophy whitetail deer. Our semi-guided hunts are for the sportsman who wants more control over his/her deer hunt. South Central Ohio is literally crawling with the Eastern species of the wild turkey. Spring Gobbler hunters are allowed to harvest two birds during the spring season in Ohio. During the our fall deer hunting season, it is hard to sit in a stand without seeing at least one flock of birds.
Outdoor Gear*Hunting & Fishing Items
GK Outfitters
14124 Co Rd AC
Wauseon, OH 433567
Ph 419-335-0243
           
 Outdoor Gear for the serious Outdoorsman.
FISHING

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Ohio Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

Approximately 500,000 people hunt deer in Ohio and the pre-hunt deer population is estimated to be 750,000 and we predict a harvest of 120,000 to 130,000 deer during the 9-day deer gun season. Last year, Ohio hunters took more than 105,000 deer during the state’s popular week-long deer gun season. An additional 21,000 deer were killed during the December weekend  hunt. Nearly 240,000 deer were taken in the 2010-2011 deer hunting season. Last year, young hunters across Ohio took approximately 8,500 deer during the state's youth deer gun hunting season. According to a deer hunter survey, license-buying deer hunters annually spend over $266 million, which includes food, transportation, gear, lodging, processing, taxidermy, leasing fees, etc.  This does not include the number of hunting licenses and deer permits purchased from the Division of Wildlife and does not include the money spent by the estimated 125,000 landowners who hunt. In 1949, the Division of Wildlife sold an all-time record 736,381 resident hunting licenses.  Hunters that year killed one million pheasants, 5.6 million rabbits, 1.4 million squirrels, and 232,000 ducks.  It was Ohio’s best hunting season of the 20th century and it happened without a statewide deer season. The first modern-day deer hunting season was open December 6-18, 1943 in Adams, Pike, and Scioto counties.  The reported legal deer harvest that year was 168 bucks.  Those deer taken on private lands and not required to be reported to a deer check station likely put the total deer harvest in 1943 over 200 deer. In 1913, Ohio’s first resident hunting license law was enacted.  This first license cost Ohio hunters an even buck.  The first non-resident hunting and trapping license was issued in 1904 at a cost of $15.Ohio had its first full-time game wardens in 1901.  They did not receive a salary at that time. By 1904, White-tailed Deer no longer existed in Ohio. During the 1920s and the 1930s, a limited restocking program began, as well as the natural migration of deer from surrounding states into Ohio. By 1937 White-tailed Deer were reported in twenty-eight of Ohio's counties, and in 1943, enough deer existed in the state for a regulated hunting season to occur in select counties. By 1956, deer existed in all of Ohio's counties, and hunting now occurred across the state. In 1995, Ohio's deer population had reached 550,000 animals.


Ohio Hunting Outfitters and Guides Turkey Facts

From 1956 to 1963, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources tried, unsuccessfully, to introduce turkeys that had been hand raised. However, as natural populations increased, many were moved to other areas of the state. Today they live in twenty-two Ohio counties. The wild turkey has returned to the Ohio landscape after many years of absence. This bird once inhabited forested areas of the entire state, providing food and sport for Native Americans and early Ohio settlers.  As settlement continued and forest lands were converted to cropland, the wild turkey population dwindled to the point that no birds remained in the state by 1904.  As large tracts of land reverted to forested areas, the ODNR Division of Wildlife began a nearly 40-year effort to reestablish the wild turkey in the state.  Early efforts, using game farm reared birds that were then released into the wild failed.  In the late 1950s and early 1960s, wild turkey were trapped in states with established populations and transplanted into Ohio forests. This approach was a success.  As these birds developed populations throughout southeast Ohio, Division biologists began trapping birds and transplanting them to other counties in the state. Today there are wild turkey in 80 of Ohio’s 88 counties.   The wild turkey is Ohio’s largest upland gamebird, standing three to four feet tall and weighing up to 24 pounds.  It has a slim build, long neck, and nearly featherless head.  The body feathers appear drab brown at a distance, but are actually iridescent when the bird appears in good light; this iridescence gives the bird its true coloration--bronze with hints of red, green, copper, and gold.  The large tail is brown with a black band at the tip.  Adult males (gobblers) Wild turkey are very adaptable animals.  Although they prefer mature forests, with substantial cover and suitable food sources, they can live successfully in areas with as little as 15 percent forest cover.  The feeding area should include a mix of forbs, grasses, and insects   There are limited numbers of areas that meet this criteria in the state.  Efforts have been made to develop habitat on public land through timber and watershed management. The wild turkey will eat a variety of foods; 90 percent of their diet is plant material and the remaining 10 percent animal.  Among the primary sources of its diet are: green plants; grass leaves and seed; greenbrier leaves and fruit; Jack-in-the-pulpit leaves, flowers, and tubers; the fruits of  flowering dogwoods, black gum, wild grape, wild cherry, and hackberry; acorns; and various wildflower and weed leaves and
seeds.

 

Ohio Hunting Outfitters and Guides Hog Facts

 Introduced to the continental United States in 1539, feral hog are rapidly becoming established throughout the country.  It is estimated that wild breeding populations of feral hog are now present in at least 35 states.  Feral hog are a combination of Eurasian wild boar and escaped/neglected domestic swine. Some have escaped from hunting preserves or have been illegally released. Having many common names such as: feral hog or pig, Eurasian or Russian wild boar, razorback, and piney woods rooter, feral swine are all considered to fall under the same ancestral genus and species of hog which have become established in several areas of Ohio. Depending on ancestral lineage and cross-breeding among breeds, feral hog can vary greatly in appearance.  Typical fur coloration for true Eurasian boar can be grey to dark brown to black, while domestic breeds can display a wider variety of colors with many defining patterns of striping or spots.  Several generations of cross-breeding between domestic and Eurasian lineages can make the physical appearance of these animals drastically different within the same family unit.  Piglets with strong Eurasian influence will display distinctive striping from nose to tail, while those with domestic lineage may appear as miniature versions of the parent.  As with coloration, the size of mature adults can vary greatly depending on the ancestral influence. In Ohio, adults typically range in size from 125-200 lbs, but larger specimens do occur.  Truly wild feral hog, which receive no supplemental feed, rarely achieve weights greater than 350 lbs in Ohio. Feral hog cause significant damage directly to agricultural crops and property, as well as natural resources each year.  Due to inexperienced investigation, feral swine damage is often incorrectly linked to white-tailed deer and other larger mammals and birds.  Therefore, losses associated with this species are often underestimated.  In 2000, it was estimated that the total damage caused by hog in the United States was approximately $800 million annually.  Since then, feral swine distribution has expanded greatly, increasing this figure significantly
Feral hog are highly mobile disease reservoirs and can carry at least 30 important viral and bacterial diseases and a minimum of 37 parasites that can affect people, pets, livestock and wildlife.  In Ohio, 2 diseases of great concern are swine brucellosis and pseudorabies, which can infect domestic and wild animal species indiscriminately.


Ohio Hunting Outfitters and Guides Duck Goose Facts

 Ohio's wetland wildlife is a varied resource consisting of both resident and migratory species.  Estimates suggest that <25% of Ohio’s original wetland habitat remains today.  It’s not surprising that over half of Ohio's threatened and endangered species are dependent on wetlands as crucial habitat.  Ohio's wetlands are an essential part of the life cycle of migratory birds which travel through the state each spring and fall between their wintering and nesting grounds.  Monitoring populations of wetland wildlife, particularly migratory birds and furbearers, is a complex year-round task that involves the cooperation of many states and countries throughout North America. The mallard duck is one of the most recognized of all duck and is the ancestor of several domestic breeds. Its wide range has given rise to several distinct populations. The male mallard's white neck-ring separates the green head from the chestnut-brown chest, contrasts with the gray sides, brownish back, black rump and black upper- and under-tail coverts. The speculum is violet-blue bordered by black and white, and the outer tail feathers are white. The bill is yellow to yellowish-green and the legs and feet are coral-red. Male utters a soft, rasping "kreep." The female mallard duck is a mottled brownish color and has a violet speculum bordered by black and white. The crown of the head is dark brown with a dark brown stripe running through the eye. The remainder of the head is lighter brown than the upper body. The bill is orange splotched with brown, and the legs and feet are orange. Female is especially vocal with the characteristic series of quacks. Mallard duck have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. .  Ohio was stratified into 1-minute latitude by 2-minute longitude blocks, and each block was assigned a potential goose density of low (<1 pair), medium (1-4 pairs), or high (>5 pairs).  Presence or absence of water-bodies was determined for each block, as only blocks with water are surveyed.  Blocks are randomly selected and are surveyed by helicopter, with the pilot and 1 biologist serving as observers.  Data collected include:  date, observer, state surveyed, plot #, lat-long, descriptive location, time, search method, number of geese observed (singles, pairs, singles with nest, pairs with nest, numbers of groups and their size), percent of plot with water or wetlands, weather conditions, and any other pertinent information.  The survey is run during mid-April to ensure the highest nesting activity.  All data are compiled and forwarded to the Mississippi Flyway Council Technical Section Giant Canada Goose Committee for analysis. Even before the giant Canada goose had been extirpated from the lower 48 states, private citizens and conservation agencies began expressing interest in restoring these birds to their former breeding range.  Ironically, the 19th century practice of capturing and domesticating wild Canada geese to use as food and live decoys, a practice that contributed to the population's demise, also provided a source of birds for restoration projects. 
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