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Manitoba Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING

 

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Deer*Bear*Moose*Waterfowl
Big Antler Outfitters
 
Ron Chekosky

Box 11
Poplarfield, MB ROC 2NO
Ph
204-664-5380 (Summer)
Ph
204-664-5380 (Winter)
           
Welcome to Big Antler Outfitters! Most of the info you will need is provided on the following pages. Hunt Spring/Fall Black Bear (also color-phases cinnamon and blond), Moose, Whitetail Deer and Waterfowl out of the North Interlake region of Manitoba, Canada. Big Antler specializes in bow/rifle trophy hunts. Owner Ron Chekosky is a life time resident of the area and been in operation for 20 years. His background includes farming, trapping, flying and his competitive nature has provided him the 'edge', so essential in this business. Results for the 2010 Spring Bear/Fall Whitetail Deer season have produced some real trophies ~~~ so please check our most recent harvest pictures on our 'Bear', 'Deer' and 'Photo Gallery' pages. An in-depth report on our 2010 harvests will be available soon.Ron's love of the 'bush' has enabled him to harvest many big game animals which include Pope & Young (P&Y) deer, bear, elk and three bull moose. He has also hunted throughout North America for mule deer, grizzly bear and cougar. Horn rattling and deer calling are very productive with our high buck-to-doe ratio.  Many hunters enjoy their first opportunity to rattle in their own deer after a short learning session from our staff. Lifetime memories of deer coming into a rattling sequence are the 'norm' with us at Big Antler Outfitters.  Our area, located on the fringe of agriculture, has us hunting the big bush, accessing remote areas never before hunted. Our complete line of modern equipment provides us access to these remote pockets of deer, which has produced quality deer for the past fifteen years
Bear*Upland Birds
Caribou Lodge Outfitters
Norman Sancartier
Box 231

Cranberry Portage, MB R0B0H0
Ph
877-472-4868 
           
Our hunting area is roughly 360 square miles in northern Manitoba. As we are located in the Pre Cambrian Shield, our area is comprised of lakes, rivers, muskegs and rock outcrops. It only has one road that runs through it and has very little human activity. None - during the spring bear season. This area has had no hunting pressures in the last 5 years. Hunters hunting the spring bear season are permitted to wear full camo clothing. Hunters hunting the fall bear season must wear regulation colors.All hunters will be required to target shoot their weapons upon arrival at the Lodge. Please ensure you can shoot your weapon and hit your target before arriving at the Lodge.We have hunting areas for the experienced and rugged trophy hunters as well as hunting areas for our more experienced and relaxed trophy hunters. We use game counters and game cameras in order to maximize hunter’s success in getting trophy animals. We will only hunt you - as hard as you want to hunt. Baiting starts by snowmobile in late March or early April and continues through to the end of the hunting season. We use a variety of baits and the type is determined by our hunting areas, available natural foods and the season. We spend a lot of time and money on baiting and bait. We maintain a minimum of 3 active bait sites per hunter. We have bait sites that are accessible by boat, ATV’s and trucks, followed by a short walk.
Bear*Moose
Lazy Bear Lodge
Wally Daudrich
Box 880
Churchill, MB R0B 0E0
Ph
204-633-9377 (Summmer)
Ph
204-633-9377 (Winter)
           


Make yourself at home in Polar Bear Country. The Lazy Bear Lodge offers the friendliest accommodations in Churchill, Manitoba, complete with handcrafted log buildings and the personal service of a family-owned lodge.  Spend two days on our Arctic Crawler tundra vehicles in search of the majestic polar bear. Your experienced guide will take you to polar bear hot spots with stops along the way at wilderness areas known for arctic fox, arctic hare and snowy owls. Each night you will return to the Lazy Bear Lodge for good food and a good night’s sleep.
   
FISHING

Walleye*Trout*Pike
Caribou Lodge Outfitters
Norman Sancartier
Box 231

Cranberry Portage, MB R0B0H0
Ph
877-472-4868 
           

From our lodge docks you can boat into 5 different lakes. Covering over 50 miles of water the scenery just doesn't come any better. Rarely we lose days due to strong winds.For the adventurous, we also have several portage lakes with boats and motors. Lake Trout, Walleye and Northern Pike are our most sought after species but we also have Brook Trout and Rainbow Trout available.Most of our guests have been returning for over 10 years and some for over 20 years. References available upon request.
   



Canoeing
Caribou Lodge Outfitters
Norman Sancartier
Box 231

Cranberry Portage, MB R0B0H0
Ph
877-472-4868 
           


Caribou Lodge is not only a great place for hunters, it is a place for family and friends. Our specialty is the ability to customize your stay from 1 -50 people.
Wedding receptions, Bus tours, Family reunions, Corporate groups (business meetings with enjoyment).We do our best to enhance your vacation with personal and friendly service designed to help you enjoy a relaxing holiday.From simple tent camping sites to cabins to motel to all inclusive outdoor adventures, we have the facilities to accommodate everyone's holiday needs. please visit our extensive photo gallery for viewing of our facilities.
   

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Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

The white-tailed deer is the most abundant and readily-seen big game animal. High deer numbers are seen in the province in spite of the historic loss of winter forest shelter to agriculture and urban development. Population estimates remain between 150,000 and 160,000. A historic peak of about 250,000 occurred in the summer of 1995, in contrast to a low of 60,000 in 1974. The severe winter of 1995/96 increased deer mortality, and a subsequent overall drop in provincial population was observed by January 1997. Locally, mortality was offset where agricultural forages were accessible (typically as hay bales) and where emergency feeding programs were initiated. An emergency program was again initiated in early 1997, when an even more severe winter occurred The deer is tan or reddish-brown in the summer and grayish-brown in the winter, with certain areas remaining white all year round. Fawns are spotted with brown tails and a white underside. When sensing danger, the deer raises its tail – this is called ‘flagging.’ Showing this large white patch on the underside of the tail signals an alarm to other deer and helps a fawn follow its mother to safety. The white-tailed deer is the most common of all of North America’s large mammals. It is also the most widely distributed. The deer can be active at any time, but is typically nocturnal, which means it is mostly active at night. Its diet consists mostly of green plants, nuts, and in the winter, wood vegetation. One unusual characteristic of the white-tailed deer is that the doe leaves her fawn unattended for hours at a time. The fawn has very little scent and its spotted coat provides natural camouflage, which keeps it safe from predators. The doe returns a few times a day to feed the fawn. Does and fawns usually stay together for about a year, sometimes two. For most of the year, bucks and does stay in separate groups, but during the winter, larger groups of deer gather together. This helps to keep winter trails cleared and offers protection from predators. The abundance and proximity of white-tailed deer to populated areas continues to provide excellent opportunities for viewing and interpretive programs. Responsive management ensures that deer meet the demand of licenced and Treaty Indian hunters. In urban and peri-urban areas, increasing deer numbers may contribute to greater numbers of deer-vehicle collisions. Agricultural forage and specialty crops, tree nurseries, market gardens and ornamental plantings continue to experience damage from deer feeding.

Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Moose Facts

Moose are found throughout the province of Manitoba ranging south from the U.S border, north to the Nunavut Territory. Until recently, there has been only occasional reports of moose in the prairie region of southern Manitoba, but populations have now become established in the Pembina and Souris River Valleys. They are also found in Spruce Woods Provincial Forest and Turtle Mountain Provincial Park in southwestern Manitoba from where they were absent until as late as the early 1970's. The moose population in Manitoba has increased from an estimated 28,000 in 1992 to about 32,000 currently. The demand for consumptive use of moose continues to exceed supply in the more accessible areas. Renewed cooperative management programs are required to encourage continued growth in moose populations. First Nations moose harvest was estimated at double the annual licenced harvest of 1,500 animals. Equitable distribution of sustainable harvest, providing opportunity for all stakeholders, will require constructive consultation. As additional forestry and recreational development occurs east of Lake Winnipeg and north and east of The Pas, more intensive management will be required to ensure that the moose population can be maintained. Moose are powerful swimmers, sometimes diving 5.5 metres or more for plants at the bottom of a lake. Swimming in the water is also a way for them to cool off in the summer, as moose suffer from the heat. They do, however, tolerate cold well. Moose can also travel through practically any terrain. Their long, stilt-like legs make it easy for them to travel over deadfall trees and deep snow. Their large hooves provide support to wade through soft muskeg and snow. Despite the moose's large size and broad antlers, it can travel silently through the forest. The moose's eyesight is poor, but they compensate for it with a good sense of smell and hearing.


Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Caribou Facts

Manitoba is the home to as many as 20 woodland caribou herds. The Manitoba government has determined the geographic ranges, calving sites and winter ranges for these herds, plus the current degree of risk for each herd in a range. Every environmental license area for forestry operations in Manitoba includes specific woodland caribou ranges. Woodland caribou are listed as endangered  through eastern Canada, and are listed as threatened in Manitoba.  caribou populations in most cases, but that finding does not obviate the need for caribou to be included in forest management. Managers must consider the indirect effects of forest operations on caribou through their impacts on caribou mortality factors, such as prédation. Lichens remain important. Habitat destruction may in some cases be the ultimate cause of population decline. Reactions of caribou to disturbance vary, and remain controversial; more research is needed. Multiple resource managers of boreal commercial forests should identify sensitive components of caribou range – calving grounds, rutting locations, wintering areas, and travel routes among them – and prescribe for these areas in forest management plans. Ways of accommodating caribou in commercial forests are not well established, but some examples suggest how this might be done. Most importantly, areas that have been proven by their continued use to contain all necessary requirements for caribou survival should not be physically altered until their essential qualities and functions are better understood.


Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Elk Facts

Elk formerly occurred in central and southwestern Manitoba. They are now restricted to the Riding Mountain, Duck Mountain, Porcupine Hills, southern Interlake, Spruce Woods, Red Deer River, and the Swan River Valley areas. The Riding Mountain population normally accounts for 40 to 50% of total provincial elk numbers. An estimated 3,500 elk are found in the Riding Mountain area, 2,000 in the Duck Mountain area, 300 in the Porcupine Hills area, 100 at Red Deer Lake, 400 in the Spruce Woods area, 800 in the southern portions of the Interlake, and about 250 that have taken up residence in the Swan River Valley. Small satellite herds exist in the Pine River-Ethelbert, Kettle Hills, Piney, Oak-Plum Lakes, Souris River Bend WMA, Rock Lake, and Turtle Mountain areas. New satellite herds recently appeared in the Kettle Hills and Piney areas. Many of these satellite groups may never become established as they quickly go beyond the tolerance of local landowners if the herds expand and cause damage on private land. Demand by hunters is far greater than the available elk hunting opportunities. Elk hunting licenses are available only through a limited entry draw system to residents of Manitoba. Seasons included rifle, archery, and landowner-only. A comprehensive management strategy for the overall provincial population has been developed by Manitoba Conservation. Detailed harvest strategies for individual herds are currently being developed. The rocky mountain elk are the most common and they are mostly found in the in the west. They have started to become transplanted to the eastern states. The Roosevelt is the largest bodied elk they are found in the rain forests of  the Pacific north west. The Manitoba elk are only found in parts of Manitoba. The tule elk is the smallest elk and is only found in portions of California. There is an estimated 1 million elk in the US today. Bull elk can weigh up to 1100 lbs. Cow can weight up to 600 lbs.  Calves weigh about 30-40 lbs. The bulls antlers can weigh 20- 30 lbs. It takes 140 days for a 3-4 year old bull to grow his antlers, while a two year old bull will take 115 days to grow his antlers.  Elk stand about five- six feet at the shoulders. Bulls have two teeth located right under their eyes. These are called whistlers, these help add the whistling sound to the elks bugle. Theses teeth are Ivory.


Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

Black bear range throughout most of Manitoba but are only occasional visitors of the major agricultural area in the southwest. The greatest densities are found in the Duck Mountain area, Porcupine Hills, Riding Mountain National Park, the Interlake and the southeastern corner of Manitoba. Manitoba's population is estimated at 25,000 - 30,000 bears. The species is managed to maintain population numbers which allow for activities such as hunting, trapping, viewing, photography and biological study to take place while minimizing risks to public safety and property. Black bear can be a concern for farmers, beekeepers and persons participating in outdoor recreation due to risks to property and safety. For information on what to do when you encounter a bear click here. The overall harvest of bears is being kept at sustainable levels, more recently through improved monitoring of their populations.Many people live in bear country, while others venture there to pursue outdoor activities. As a result, contact, between black bear and people, is inevitable. For many, the bear is seen as a cute and cuddly "Hollywood" character that is charismatic and often enamored. What they fail to appreciate is that bears can also be fierce predators capable of killing both wild and domestic animals, and in the rare case, humans.The coat color of black bear is commonly black. However, it can range from blond, cinnamon or light brown to dark chocolate including many intermediate color combinations. Black bear are naturally inquisitive and normally timid, but they can also be bold. A bear actions are dictated by its personality, what it has learned from its mother, the experiences it has gained on its own and, of course its own instincts. Manitoba’s black bear management focuses on maintaining healthy bear populations while safeguarding human welfare and minimizing damage to crops and property. This becomes a delicate balance as human populations expand into areas occupied by bear and as bear reoccupy unmanaged land that was once cultivated. Our approach in minimizing conflicts between humans and bears is two-fold: hunting to manage the density and distribution of bear; and, education and awareness to inform people how to deter bear from associating people and dwellings with food.

 


Manitoba Hunting Outfitters and Guides Wolf Facts

Wolf are primarily restricted to boreal forests and tundra. In agro-Manitoba, segregated populations are found in islands of habitat including Riding Mountain National Park, Duck Mountain Provincial Forest, and reportedly in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park/Shilo Military Base Forest. Wolves also commonly occur in agricultural fringe areas bordering Sandilands and Agassiz Provincial Forests, the Interlake, and Westlake areas. Manitoba's wolf population numbers approximately 4,000 and appears to be stable. An exception is the Riding Mountain population which decreased from historical levels during the 1990's. In response to this decline, wolf hunting has been curtailed around the Riding Mountain. There is strong public support for protecting this population which is quite isolated and may be genetically unique.Gray wolf and coyotes can be hunted under the authority of any big game licence, and as such, there are no tagging requirements. The hunter’s big game licence number is all that is required to possess a wolf or coyote taken under the authority of that licence. Hunters are reminded that the tag affixed to a big game licence (bear, deer, moose, elk, or caribou) must be used for that big game species (bear, deer, moose, elk or caribou). A resident may hunt gray wolves and coyotes in any valid GHA during the wolf and coyote season if they possess any big game hunting licence for the current licence year. However, if hunting in a GHA while the area is open to deer, elk, moose, black bear or caribou hunting, the wolf or coyote hunter must have an unused deer, elk, moose, black bear or caribou game tag (personal or party), which is valid for that area, species and time period. Where the deer, elk, moose, black bear or caribou hunting seasons are closed, a resident may hunt wolves or coyotes provided he/she is in possession of a used or unused deer, elk, moose, black bear or caribou licence. In areas where wolf populations are stable, Manitoba Conservation permits trappers and hunters to harvest wolf, particularly where increased harvest may reduce conflict between wolves and agricultural interests. Generally, Manitoba Conservation adheres to a policy of non-intervention in the vast majority of the gray wolf range in boreal forest and tundra areas. However, where wolves encroach on agricultural areas and prey on domestic livestock, or where wolves venture into northern communities, control measures targeted at offending animals are implemented. In all areas, wolf population levels remain adequate to support the value of wolves for educational and viewing purposes.
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