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Louisiana Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING

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Deer*Duck*Dove
Dream Hunt Resort
Keith & Brian Whitmore
9192 Highway 1 South
Alexandria, La 71302
Ph 318-253-2390
Ph 318-359-0162
        

There is nothing like hunting Louisiana white-tail deer. Big heavy-horned-rack white-tail deer! That's what we have at Dream Hunt Resort, and the only rule is eight points are better. There is no additional trophy fee for certain size spreads. Eight points are better is the rule. It's always an easy access as with any other hunting here. Keith or his son Brian will escort you to the hottest area which provides a 4x4 enclosed stand, hunting a food plot with corn feeders. Rice brand is also used. All you have to do is enjoy the scenery, watch the deer and count to 8. At Dream Hunt kids 15yrs of age or younger hunt for free with a paying adult. Deer stands are setup for two.Spring, summer and fall food plots are planted to keep our deer healthy, allowing them to grow big. Come check us out, and maybe your Louisiana Deer Hunting Dreams will come true. There is nothing like hunting Louisiana white-tail deer. Big heavy-horned-rack white-tail deer! That's what we have at Dream Hunt Resort and the only rule is eight points are better. There is no additional trophy fee for certain size spreads. Eight points are better is the rule. It's always an easy access as with any other hunting here. Keith or his son Brian will escort you to the hottest area which provides a 4x4 enclosed stand, hunting a food plot with corn feeders. Rice brand is also used. All you have to do is enjoy the scenery, watch the deer and count to 8. At Dream Hunt kids 15yrs of age or younger hunt for free with a paying adult. Deer stands are setup for two. Spring, summer and fall food plots are planted to keep our deer healthy, allowing them to grow big. Come check us out, and maybe your Louisiana Deer Hunting Dreams will come true. Duck hunting at Dream Hunt Resort has been great. You have to be in a flyway to bag ducks. With Catahoula and Louisiana Delta to the north of us, Red River only a mile away, along with thousands of acres of rice fields to the south, our location makes a great flyway for ducks and an excellent chance to bag all types of species.
Deer*Turkey
Missouri John's Outfitters
Monroe, LA 71201
         
Missouri John's Outfitters offers combination, corporate, and other kinds of guided hunts and fishing excursions that immerse you in the wildlife that this beautiful land has to offer. Your hunting success and personal satisfaction are important to us. We hope that you enjoy reviewing our Website and we look forward to serving you as a whitetail deer hunting client and gaining you as a friend. Our friendly service and hunter-friendly policies help us win your loyalty and friendship. As a whitetail deer hunting guide service, we strive to place you in a location that will allow you to see and take a shot at a trophy buck. It is our passion and obsession to make each hunt an enjoyable and memorable one. Besides providing whitetail deer hunting guide service, we also provide trophy turkey hunts. We have harvested several trophy gobblers over the years and hope that you can too! Experience hunting for turkey and deer like never before when you book a guided hunt through our company in Albany, Missouri. Missouri John's Outfitters wants to make your hunt as memorable and enjoyable as possible, which is why our guided hunts include everything you need to track and hunt wildlife successfully. Missouri has one of the largest Eastern wild turkey populations in the country to give you multiple opportunities to harvest 2 of these beautiful birds. The state's 3-week spring season opens the third Monday in April and its fall turkey hunting season opens in October when the longbeards are in flocks of at least 20. Experience hunting for turkey and deer like never before when you book a guided deerbhunt through our company in Albany, Missouri. Missouri John's Outfitters wants to make your hunt as memorable and enjoyable as possible, which is why our guided hunts include everything you need to track and hunt wildlife successfully. Contact us today to set up your first hunt. Missouri John's Outfitters has some of the finest Midwestern whitetail deer hunts in the state of Missouri by way of archery, blackpowder, and rifle. All hunts are guided or semi-guided.

   
FISHING

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Louisiana Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

Louisiana, restocked deer in the 1950s and 1960s,  the deer study leader for the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. In 1969, we made our last big deer release. In 1970, we opened up most of the state to deer hunting. By 1975, the entire state was opened as deer herds were beginning to build up. As recently as the late 1960s and early 1970s, seeing a deer track in many Louisiana forests electrified the hunting community. Many areas stood devoid of deer for decades. However, by the mid-1970s, deer re-established themselves throughout most of the state and country. Populations continued to rise rapidly, as did the popularity of deer hunting. While many are quick to blame low deer numbers due to drought, coyotes, poor habitat, etc., the plain and simple fact is that deer had an abundant food source available to them — and they did not have to visit the feeders and food plots as most hunters hoped they would and subsequently banked their hunting outings on.A very mild winter also kept native browse greener than usual, providing the deer with sufficient food. It has always been my observation that an abundant mast crop will keep deer movement to a minimum, and a mild winter will keep them out of the green patches and foraging on the native plants in the thickets and woods, especially when the hunting pressure increases. One of the advantages to being a member of the Quality Deer Management Association is that one is privy to information about deer management and deer hunting from across the country. The association has begun publishing an Annual Report of Deer Hunting in North America that is available to the membership. Deer are the only native animals that routinely browse plants 4 to 5 feet above the ground. They eat about five pounds per day (dry weight) of hundreds of species of both native and non-native plants but have definite preferences for certain plants, fruits and nuts. Some of their favorites include Japanese honeysuckle, acorns, grapes, apples, persimmons, greenbrier, blackberry, maple, blackgum, grasses, corn, clover, summer weeds, and sumac. Deer are known as generalists because of their ability to thrive in a wide variety of habitats including forests, woodlots, suburbs, golf courses, extensive agriculture, swamps and coastal marshes. High deer numbers are a serious concern because they can destroy their own habitat and that of dozens of other species, even causing extirpation of plant species. The best deer habitat contains mixed ages of pine and hardwood forests interspersed with openings and agriculture. This provides the optimum combination of food, cover, and water that are the essential components of any habitat.


Louisiana Hunting Outfitters and Guides Turkey Facts

Prior to 1880, the wild turkey population in Louisiana was estimated to be as high as one million birds. However, by the turn of the century, the state's turkey population started a precipitous decline. Exploitation of our virgin forests, subsistence hunting, market hunting, and unregulated sport hunting played roles in the declining wild turkey population in the state. By 1946, Louisiana's turkey population was estimated to be only 1,463 turkeys. Beginning in 1962, a restoration program that consisted of trapping and releasing wild captured birds into suitable habitat was initiated. Since that time, the state's wild turkey population has grown to an estimated 80,000 birds.The Wild Turkey Program includes management, restoration, and population monitoring and research of the wild turkey in Louisiana. In order to meet public demands for this resource, Wildlife Division biologists offer technical assistance to improve habitat on public and private lands for the benefit of the wild turkey. In addition, monies for various projects are made available through LDWF's Wild Turkey Stamp Program and the Louisiana State Chapter of The National Wild Turkey Federation's Super Fund Program. Two population monitoring surveys are conducted to develop population indices and to track population trends of wild turkeys. The Program biologist represents LDWF on several technical committees that are involved in monitoring and formulating regional and national programs that can impact on the wild turkey.Between 5,000 to 6,000 feathers cover the body of an adult turkey in patterns called feather tracts. A turkey  feathers provide a variety of survival functions—they keep it warm and dry, allow it to fly, and show off for the opposite sex. The head and upper part of the neck are featherless. Most of the feathers exhibit a metallic glittering, called iridescence, with varying colors of red, green, copper, bronze and gold. Only males have spurs. Both sexes have powerful legs covered with scales and are born with a small button spur on the back of the leg. Soon after birth, a male's spur starts growing pointed and curved and can grow to about 2 inches. Most hens' spurs do not grow any longer than they are at birth. Hen turkeys lay a "clutch" of 10 to 12 eggs over a 10 to 14-day period, usually laying one egg per day. Eggs are incubated for about 28 days, and are occasionally turned and rearranged until they are ready to hatch. A newly hatched flock must be ready to leave the nest within 12 to 24 hours to feed.


Louisiana Hunting Outfitters and Guides Alligator Facts

he Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries manages the American alligator  as a commercial, renewable natural resource. Sustained use program is one of the world’s most recognizable examples of a wildlife conservation success story. Louisiana’s program has been used as a model for managing various alligator species throughout the world. Since the inception of wild harvest program in 1972, over 850,000 wild alligators have been harvested and sold bringing in millions of dollars of revenue to landowners and trappers.  Conservative estimates have valued these resources at over $250,000,000, providing significant, direct economic benefit to Louisiana. Alligator have been used commercially for their valuable leather since the 1800s.  This harvest was generally unregulated throughout the 1900s, until a gradual population decline resulted in severely reduced harvests in the early 1950s.  In 1962, the alligator season in Louisiana was closed, and research studies, focusing on basic life history factors, were undertaken which led to development of a biologically sound management harvest program. Wild alligator harvest program are to manage and conserve Louisiana’s alligator as part of the state’s wetland ecosystem, provide benefits to the species, its habitat and the other species of fish and wildlife associated with alligator.  The basic philosophy was to develop a sustained use management program which, through regulated harvest, would provide long term benefits to the survival of the species, maintain its habitats, and provide significant economic benefits to the citizens of the state.  Since Louisiana’s coastal alligator habitats are primarily privately owned (approximately 81%), our sustained use management program provides direct economic benefit and incentive to private landowners, and alligator hunters who lease land, to protect the alligator and to protect, maintain, and enhance the alligator wetland habitats.  One of the most critical components of the wild harvest program is to equitably distribute the harvest in relation to population levels.Their diets include prey species that are abundant and easily accessible. Juvenile alligators eat primarily insects, amphibians, small fish, and other invertebrates. Adult alligators eat rough fish, snakes, turtles, small mammals, and birds. Go to the following links for more information: Nearly all alligators become sexually mature by the time they reach approximately 7 feet in length although females can reach maturity at 6 feet. A female may require 10-15 years and a male 8-12 years to reach these lengths. Courtship begins in early April, and mating occurs in May or June. Females build a mound nest of soil, vegetation, or debris and deposit an average of 32 to 46 eggs in late June or early July. Incubation requires approximately 60-65 days, and hatching occurs in late August or early September. The tell-tale eye-shine of an alligator (and other nocturnal vertebrates) is caused by a layer of cells called the tapetum lucidum (a Latin phrase meaning "bright carpet"). This structure is located beneath the photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) in the retina and reflects light back into these cells to increase the amount of light detected, which improves an alligator's vision in low light conditions. In alligators this eye-shine is red, but it can be different colors in other species.


Louisiana Hunting Outfitters and Guides Hog Facts

Hunter harvest data suggest that feral hog populations in western Louisiana are increasing, and population control in this region is complicated by the mixing of feral and domestic free-ranged hog. Aggressive management may be warrant adult feral hog commonly weigh 200 lbs, but may reach over 400 lbs.  They vary in color from black, brown, white, blonde, or reddish brown, and may be spotted or banded.  Piglets may have longitudinal black stripes, which eventually transitions to typical adult coloration.  One of the most recognizable indicators of feral hog are their tracks.  They are similar to deer tracks, but have rounded or blunt tipped hooves.   Feral hog have continually growing canine teeth, also known as tusks or cutters, which grow to 3 inches in older boars.  Adult sows and their young stay in family groups known as sounders, and are territorial.  Boar hog are typically solitary and may only interact with sounders to breed.  Feral hog are extremely prolific, having the potential to rapidly expand their population. Sows can have up to 10 piglets per litter and reach sexual maturity at 6 months of age.  They have a gestation period of 115 days, allowing 2 litters per year.  Feral hog have virtually no natural predators, so piglet survival is nearly 100 percent. Feral Hog are plagued by a multitude of diseases that can affect humans, commercial swine operations, or  wildlife.  Precautions should be taken when field dressing or butchering feral hog. Wear disposable plastic or rubber gloves, wash hands with soap and hot water when finished, and thoroughly cook all wild hog meat.  Some of the most notable diseases carried by feral hog are: The causative agent for swine brucellosis is Brucellosis sus, which is transmitted through ingestion of infected tissue and fluids,  or venereally.  Humans can get hog brucellosis by handling infected tissue.  Some of the most common damage caused by feral hog is a result of their rooting.  Excessive rooting can drastically impact  crops, golf courses, levees, hayfields, tree farms, and even lawns.  Much of this damage occurs after rain events or in irrigated areas during periods of drought.  Rooting may lead to erosion, excess soil moisture, and the inability to operate equipment.  Excessive hog rooting can eliminate the opportunity to cut hay.  Feral hog are also known to prey upon livestock and wildlife.  They are known to catch and consume baby goats, lambs, and calves, usually leaving no evidence of theattack.  If the opportunity is available, feral hog will consume fawns, rabbits, turkey nests, and any other wildlife they encounter.  Feral hog can be especially damaging to crops and food plots. In addition to consuming the crop, they can trample crops, uproot plants, and disrupt drainage. the same applies to food plots, where feral hog are attracted to freshly tilled soil with highly palatable plantings.  Where feral hog densities are high, food plots may be completely destroyed within weeks.  Feral hog will directly compete with other wildlife for important resources, especially hard and soft mast.
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