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Kentucky Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING

 

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Deer*Turkey*Waterfowl
Western Kentucky Outdoors
1401 Mattingly Drive
Henderson, KY 42420
Cell 812-598-1193
 
Here at Western Kentucky Outdoors you won’t find a so-called pro. We are the guys who are behind the scenes making the so-called pro's look like pros and helping hunters bag that trophy buck they are after!!!! One thing is for sure; this site and our operation exists because of the passion we have for the outdoors here in Western Kentucky. One reason you are probably here is because you are seeking information about hunting in Kentucky yourselfWe tell it like it is here at Western Kentucky Outdoors. Simply put we speak the truth. Our services will not put you in a 5 star lodge, provide 7 course meals or place you in a heated blind. What we will do is tailor your hunt to your liking, assist in getting you here, help you make accommodations and guide you in the field for the purpose you came to the state of Kentucky for to kill a trophy buck, an Eastern Wild Turkey, or Waterfowl. With Western Kentucky Outdoors you will be hunting trophy bucks. Thanks to the KDFWR, Kentucky has become one of the top producers of trophy deer in recent years. With a one buck limit many Kentucky deer make it past 2 ½ years of age, allowing them to mature and grow the head gear of a trophy deer.  Kentucky now ranks 5th as Boone and Crocket producing state.
Deer*Turkey
Kentucky Trophy Hunts
Chuck Stephens
Ph 770-262-1374
Thanks for visiting Kentucky Trophy Bucks. 2011 was a very good year for us. We harvested good deer from opening day until the last muzzleloader hunt in December. We generally hunt a limited amount of dates which limits the number of hunters that we can hunt. returned from farm on July 29, 2012 this trip was to primarily check on foodplots and fill deer feeders. The deer had already started hitting the feeders hard and devastated the mineral sites. This year Kentucky Trophy Bucks will be offering self-guided deer hunts to hunters. Hunts will be 3 day minimum deer hunts which will include lodging and farms to hunt on. Spring Turkey Season started off with a lot of gobbling and a good many mature gobblers being harvested throughout the season. Turkeys were in fields and on the roadbeds in search of hens and were very vocal at times. This spring turkey season we primarily had self guided turkey hunts. Our turkey hunters were successful from day 1. We had in 8 hunters in camp and 7 of them killed mature birds opening day. Most of the Turkeys being harvested just after daylight . Here are some photos of turkeys harvested.
FISHING

Bow Fishing
Western Kentucky Outdoors
1401 Mattingly Drive
Henderson, KY 42420
Cell 812-598-1193
 
This trip is best between April and July when rough fish are found shallow and fall easily to stalking them. It's not uncommon to shoot 100 fish or more per outing. This trip may involve shooting from a boat, from shore or while wading depending on the time of year. You will be made aware of the method we will be using and location. Our Bowfishing trips run 6-8 hours.
   
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Kentucky Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

In Kentucky, almost 200,000 people enjoy hunting deer each season. A good percentage o f deer hunter’s hunt on their own land and this booklet is designed as a guide for those who are interested in managing their lands for more or bigger deer. There are several different management practices landowners can follow, and it’s up to you to select which you prefer. This publication provides the information you’ll need to help develop the kind of deer herd you want. You many simply want to attract more deer to your farm, or you may want to manage for trophy deer. While the size and location of your land will somewhat dictate the level of success you can have, chances are that if you have seen deer on your property the guidelines listed here will work for you. Operational cost increases should be little, if any. In fact, many of the suggestions can increase they value of your land. Managing your land for deer is not difficult. But there are a number of other factors in addition to habitat development you should be aware of before getting started. This booklet will also familiarize you with the whitetail’s habits, needs and how regulations are used by the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in managing deer responsibly. The white-tailed deer breeding season in Kentucky runs from October through mid-January, reaching its peak in November.  Most fawns are born in June, following a seven month gestation period.  Newborn fawns will weight about four pounds at birth. Deer offspring are cared for and may remain with the mother until the next spring.  Fawns retain their spots until mid-September and nurse until midOctober.  About 40 percent of female fawns breeding at age 1-1/2 or older generally have twins, and sometimes triplets.  By November, Kentucky’s deer population typically increases slightly more than one fawn per doe.  Although many more fawns are born than one per doe, some will die before the hunting season arrives. A deer’s home range averages about 500 acres.  In mountains, the home range may exceed 1,000 acres.  Even though this size area can support about 40 deer, these animals will not always stay just within their home range. Many will travel on and off that amount of land at different times of the year looking for the best food and cover available. Given that fact, there are no guarantees that deer management will work on small farms, especially if surrounding lands do not offer some deer habitat, too.  The other side of the coin is that if there are some deer present in your area, you may be able to increase the frequency of use of your land by providing food and cover.


Kentucky Hunting Outfitters and Guides Hog Facts

State wildlife officials say herds of wild hog are spreading in Kentucky, but a booking agent for hunters says he can't find enough of the animals to justify bringing in clients to hunt them. A state survey in 1998 found wild hog in only two counties in southeastern Kentucky. By 2005, he said, they were spotted in seven counties, including Muhlenberg and Christian in western Kentucky, The state has no estimate of the total number of wild hog. But one male and one female can produce a litter of six, and in six months, they will be sexually active. The hog population can explode in a very short time. In western Kentucky, there's a herd of wild hog in the Pond River bottoms along the Muhlenberg, Hopkins and Christian county border that could number 1,000, according to state fish and wildlife officials. There's more people wanting to hunt them than there are hog and get an average of four inquiries a week from people who want to hunt hog in Kentucky. Not just hunt hog. They specify Kentucky because they're from up north and it's closer. Given the high reproductive rate of feral hog, many more native wildlife species are likely impacted.  The bottom line is that native wildlife species need a reprieve in the form of aggressive feral hog reduction. Many of them are also asking the question, do feral hogs have diseases that cause concern?  The answer is yes.  Three diseases that cause the most concern are swine brucellosis, psuedorabies, and tularemia, although, feral hog harbor other diseases as well. When humans contract swine brucellosis it is called undulant fever because body temperature rises and falls along with flu-like symptoms.  In pigs, symptoms include abortions, lameness, arthritis, abscesses, infertility, and sometimes death. Swine brucellosis is of concern to the cattle industry because this bacterium can cause a false positive test for bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus).  When a positive test for bovine brucellosis is found, the cattle herd is quarantined leaving the rancher with aneconomic loss.

 


Kentucky Hunting Outfitters and Guides Turkey Facts

Turkey hunting in Kentucky has never been better than it is today. Harvest numbers continue to rise and in 2010 the state total eclipsed 36,000 birds. The swamps and forests of Kentucky provide excellent habitat for a growing turkey population. You can find turkeys on just about all of Kentucky’s over 1.5 million acres of public land. However, some areas are better than others. The Daniel Boone National Forest is by far the number one piece of public hunting land in Kentucky. It is located in the eastern portion of the state. Over 1/3 of all public land turkeys in Kentucky are taken in the Daniel Boone National Forest. It’s 700,000+ acres are home to deep forested ridges, lakes, and streams. With so much space, finding a spot to yourself usually isn’t a problem. The area is so vast if you do encounter other hunters, keep moving deeper within the forest and you‘re sure to find solitude. If you are like a lot of other hunters who don’t have access to private land for turkey hunting, rather than going door to door trying to find a place to hunt, try some of the public hunting land your state has to offer. There are acres upon acres of land waiting for you to score big and get a tom. While turkey hunting on public land can bring vast rewards, it is very different than hunting on someone’s back 40. Here are a few tips I have learned that will help bring you success and safety while hunting public land.The turkey is a large game bird native to North American forested areas. An adult male wild turkey is about 1.2 m (4 ft) long and has metallic greenish, bronze, or brownish plumage, broad rounded wings and tail, and long, slim, spurred legs. Their field of vision is about 270 degrees. A tuft of hair like feathers (beard) hangs from the breast. A fleshy growth called a snood hangs from the front of the head. Brightly colored growths called caruncles and a pouchlike area called a wattle mark the throat region.
Turkeys feed on acorns, seeds, berries, and insects. The hen incubates the 11 to 20 pale spotted eggs for about 28 days.The young are called poults. Turkey can run at speeds up to 20 miles per hour. Turkey can reach flight speeds of 50-55 mph in a matter of seconds. Two species--the wild turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, of the eastern and central United States and Mexico, and the ocellated turkey, Agriocharis ocellata, of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and adjacent areas--make up the family Meleagrididae, which is classified with pheasants in the order Galliformes. The smaller ocellated turkey lacks the tuft of breast feathers, is more brilliantly colored, and has bright eyespots on the tail coverts.

 


Kentucky Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

In Kentucky, it took about 25 years for natural range expansion to establish a bear population, not by a planned restocking effort. Male bear arrived first, followed by sows that eventually produced cubs. Bear re-colonized eastern Kentucky's mountain region from the neighboring states of West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee, where bear populations remained viable.The bear in Harlan, Letcher and Pike counties are genetically similar to bear in West Virginia and Virginia, and the McCreary County population is more genetically similar to bears that were transplanted into Tennessee from the Great Smoky Mountains. Bear now have access to large chunks of quality forest habitat in Kentucky since timber stands have reached maturity after being cut about a century ago. As a result, Kentucky has a resident bear population that is only going to get bigger and more visible with time. In the late 1990s, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife would typically receive about 20 to 30 reports a year of bear sightings. The numbers swelled to hundreds a year a decade later. Male black bear make major movements, particularly during the breeding season. For that reason, they’ve been seen as far west as Henry County, along the Palisades, and in the Knobs area. As far as Cox has been able to determine, the core of the actual breeding population, the female bear, currently is restricted to a four- or five-county area in southeast Kentucky. Bear with white-bluish fur are known as Kermode (glacier) bears and these unique color. American black bears are omnivorous: plants, fruits, nuts, insects, honey, salmon, small mammals and carrion. In northern regions, they eat spawning salmon. Black bears will also occasionally kill young deer or elk calves. Bear are extremely adaptable and show a great variation in habitat types, though they are primarily found in forested areas with thick ground vegetation and an abundance of fruits, nuts, and vegetation. In the northern areas, they can be found in the tundra, and they will sometimes forage in fields or meadows. Black bears tend to be solitary animals, with the exception of mothers and cubs. The bear usually forage alone, but will tolerate each other and forage in groups if there is an abundance of food in one area. Most bear hibernate depending on local weather conditions and availability of food during the winter months. In regions where there is a consistent food supply and warmer weather throughout the winter, bear may not hibernate at all or do so for a very brief time. Females give birth and usually remain denned throughout the winter, but males and females without young may leave their dens from time to time during winter months.
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