Your Subtitle text
Georgia Hunting Outfitters & Guides
Select a category above to view listings for a specific activity in this area.
Select a State / Province:
 
   

HUNTING

 

OneStopOutfitters Home Page Outiftters,if you would like a FREE listing please Contact Us

Deer*Turkey*Quail*Dove
High Pine Hunting Preserve
Box 706
Buena Vista, GA31803
Ph 229-649-7395
           
High Pine is a full service hunting preserve that offers deer, turkey, quail, dove, duck and beaver hunts. Our guides and staff are eager to share some of the best hunting to be found in middle Georgia. High Pine is located outside Buena Vista, Georgia in Marion County. Close enough to Columbus, yet far enough away from the city rush to make a relaxing retreat for you and your guests. The deer hunting is, in a word, fantastic. Careful harvesting of only mature bucks over the years has allowed the continued growth of our deer population. We periodically place special game tracking cameras in different areas and we can show you some spectacular animals. Enjoy sitting in a heavily wooded forest or atop one of our many food plots. The deer are plentiful and you are sure to see many. Patience is all it takes to bag a trophy. Turkey is probably the second most requested hunt. High Pine boasts three major creeks, tall pines and hardwoods plus corn, peanuts and soybean fields. The turkey are spoiled year round. Our gobblers are large and love to strut their stuff. Our experienced guides can call'em in or you can test your skills solo-either way, if it's birds you want, we have plenty. A fast growing favorite for hunters here is good old-fashioned quail hunting. Hedgerows and field edges have been cultivated to form a natural habitat to restore our wild quail population along with released birds.
 
Deer*Turkey*Quail*Dove
Pine Ridge Plantation
Dan Giles
1951 Edison Hwy
Fort Gaines, GA 39851

Ph 229-768-2110
           
Located in the southwestern part of Georgia along the Chattahoochee River, Pine Ridge Hunting Plantation gives you the ultimate Georgia hunting for deer, turkey, quail and dove. Our lodge and hunting properties are privately owned and operated, offering a quiet family atmosphere. We have 5000 acres of planted pines, hardwood bottoms, and farmland, all of which is hunted by our clients only. Your Georgia deer hunting trip begins with getting settled into the lodge. An afternoon snack will be provided for you to eat there or take with you, if you prefer. Also, there is a shooting range onsite for rifle and archery hunters to check their weapons before heading to the woods. Then a guide will escort you to your stand for a peaceful and relaxing afternoon hunt. Southwest Georgia is the perfect place to begin your grand slam bid. After stopping in with us and having a go at some Eastern turkey, you are a reasonable drive from a chance at an Osceola turkey. Even if you are just a novice turkey hunter. Quail hunting is one of the South's oldest traditions. Watching our bird dogs work through the tall pines and broom sedge will take you back to a time long forgotten. This is a place where cotton is still king and the quail is the prince of game birds
   
FISHING

Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters
Georgia Outfitters


Georgia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

White-tailed deer once were nearly eliminated in the state of Georgia, but through diligent wildlife management efforts deer were successfully restored throughout the state. In fact, the current deer population exceeds 1.2 million. Deer are a valuable natural, recreational, and economic resource in Georgia, bringing in more than $800 million per year in hunting license fees, sporting equipment sales, food and land leases. However, deer densities in some localized areas have the potential to inflict significant damage to forestry, agricultural or horticultural crops, home gardens, and shrubbery. But because deer are important both biologically and economically, management of their numbers requires consideration on numerous levels. Deer home range sizes in Georgia vary from 150 acres to more than 1,200 acres with does having smaller ranges than bucks. Smaller ranges also are found in higher deer populations in better deer habitat such as that found in the Georgia Piedmont and Upper Coastal Plain. Deer are most active around dawn and dusk. This is called a crepuscular activity pattern. Deer home range sizes in Georgia vary from 150 acres to more than 1,200 acres with does having smaller ranges than bucks. Smaller ranges also are found in higher deer populations in better deer habitat such as that found in the Georgia Piedmont and Upper Coastal Plain. Deer are most active around dawn and dusk. This is called a crepuscular activity pattern. Deer are the only native animals that routinely browse plants 4 to 5 feet above the ground. They eat about five pounds per day (dry weight) of hundreds of species of both native and non-native plants but have definite preferences for certain plants, fruits and nuts. Some of their favorites include Japanese honeysuckle, acorns, grapes, apples, persimmons, greenbrier, blackberry, maple, blackgum, grasses, corn, clover, summer weeds, and sumac. Deer are known as generalists because of their ability to thrive in a wide variety of habitats including forests, woodlots, suburbs, golf courses, extensive agriculture, swamps and coastal marshes. High deer numbers are a serious concern because they can destroy their own habitat and that of dozens of other species, even causing extirpation of plant species. The best deer habitat contains mixed ages of pine and hardwood forests interspersed with openings and agriculture. This provides the optimum combination of food, cover, and water that are the essential components of any habitat.


Georgia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Turkey Facts

The restoration of the wild turkey is one of Georgia’s great conservation success stories. Although the turkey population currently hovers around 335,000 statewide, as recently as 1973, the wild turkey population was as low as 17,000. Intensive restoration efforts, such as the restocking of wild birds and establishment of biologically sound hunting seasons facilitated the recovery of wild turkey in every county. This successful turkey effort resulted from cooperative partnerships between private landowners, hunters. Fall was the preferred time to hunt wild turkey by most of the famous old time turkey hunters and is still favored by many traditionalists. These turkey hunting experts liked it best because it was a lot more difficult and therefore more rewarding to call in an old gobbler in the fall than the spring. Turkey in the late summer, fall and winter become very solitary animals with very little interest in females. They do, however, gobble in the fall and there have been a few mornings in October and Novemeber that I could have sworn it was spring with all the gobbling around. On rare occasions, turkey will even come in strutting and gobbling just like spring. More likely though you won't even notice a fall turkey coming in to your calls. He will just appear silently, looking for companionship with another longbeard but not really caring whether he finds it or not. This is a real fall gobbler. The fall season has regained its popularity recently with the ever-increasing numbers of turkey. Over 40 states now host fall turkey seasons and more and more hunters are discovering the excitement of hunting in the fall.


Georgia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Hog Facts

Feral hog populations are expanding in Georgia, impairing water quality, damaging native plant and animal communities, wrecking landscapes and gardens, and reducingagricultural production in many areas of the state. To develop management strategies for feral hogs, a landowner or manager needs to understand their behaviors and recognize their signs. Feral hog leave evidence, or sign, of their passing. The most noticeable sign is the damage caused by their destructive rooting behavior. However, during a drought, rooting is minimal, and other signs are more common, such as hog wallows, rubs, tracks, trails, droppings, and beds.Feral hogs are opportunistic omnivores, meaning they eat whatever plant and animal matter is available. Eggs of ground-nesting birds like northern bobwhite and wild turkey are on their menu. While feral hog are not the only nest predators of  wild turkeys, this research indicated that reducing  or driving feral hog from the area increased nest  success.  Other contributing factors like rainfall could  also contribute to nest success, but removal of a nonnative predator like feral hog should be considered a part of ranch management.  It is important to utilize several control methods for feral hogs, which may include trapping, snaring, shooting, and use of dogs and hunting.  Given the high reproductive rate of feral hog, many more native wildlife species are likely impacted.  The bottom line is that native wildlife species need a reprieve in the form of aggressive feral hog reduction. Many of them are also asking the question, do feral hogs have diseases that cause concern?  The answer is yes.  Three diseases that cause the most concern are swine brucellosis, psuedorabies, and tularemia, although, feral hog harbor other diseases as well. When humans contract swine brucellosis it is called undulant fever because body temperature rises and falls along with flu-like symptoms.  In pigs, symptoms include abortions, lameness, arthritis, abscesses, infertility, and sometimes death. Swine brucellosis is of concern to the cattle industry because this bacterium can cause a false positive test for bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus).  When a positive test for bovine brucellosis is found, the cattle herd is quarantined leaving the rancher with aneconomic loss. A boar hog has four continually growing tusks that can be extremely sharp, and may reach five inches before they are broken or worn from use. Tusks are used for defense and to establish dominance during breeding. A male feral hog also develops a thick, tough skin composed of cartilage and scar tissue on the shoulder area which is sometimes referred to as a shield. The shield develops continually as the hog ages and through fighting. Tusks which are found on the lower jaw, or mandible, can be extremely dangerous when put to use by a mature hog. The upper tusks, or whittlers, help keep the lower tusk extremely sharp. The pure Russian hog is generally light brown or black with a cream or tan color on the tips of the bristles. Its underside is lighter in color and its legs, ears and tail are darker than the rest of the coat. Its bristles are the longest of the three types of wild hog. Pure Russian hog have longer legs and snouts and their head to body ratio is much greater than a feral hog. They also tend to have shorter, straighter tails.


Georgia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Alligator Facts

The American alligator is a conservation success story. Due to loss of habitat and unregulated market hunting, alligator were reduced to low numbers by the early 1900s. Thanks to the efforts of conservationists and state wildlife agencies, alligator were listed as endangered in 1967. This status, combined with proactive management and law enforcement efforts by wildlife professionals, allowed alligator populations to rebound and they now flourish over most of their historic range. Alligator populations increased to the point that their protected status was downlisted in 1987 allowing greater flexibility to manage populations. The alligator population in Georgia is one of many renewable natural resources that can sustain limited harvest in concert with biological monitoring and periodic evaluations. Georgias flourishing alligator population is managed through a regulated hunting season. Additionally, licensed nuisance alligator agent-trappers annually remove about 450 alligator in the state. If you are interested in participating in a totally hands-on, eye-to-eye hunting adventure unlike any other hunting experience you can pursue in Georgia, then the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division invites you to submit an application for the opportunity to participate in Georgia's alligator hunting season. Anyone hunting or assisting an alligator permit holder must possess a valid Alligator Hunting License (Resident License is $50 and Non-Resident License is $200) in addition to a regular hunting license. A WMA license is required if hunting on a WMA. Disability, Honorary & Lifetime License holders are exempt from these requirements. Hunters must be at least twelve years of age. Hunters age 12-15 need not have an Alligator Hunting License or Hunting License; however, they must possess a valid permit or be with a permit holder. In order to hunt unsupervised they must have a valid Hunter Education Certificate. Hunters may use hand-held ropes or snares, snatch hooks, harpoons, gigs or arrows with a restraining line attached. Legal alligator must be dispatched immediately upon capture by using a handgun or bangstick, or by severing the spinal cord with a sharp implement. Nearly all alligator become sexually mature by the time they reach approximately 7 feet in length although females can reach maturity at 6 feet. A female may require 10-15 years and a male 8-12 years to reach these lengths. Courtship begins in early April, and mating occurs in May or June. Female alligator build a mound nest of soil, vegetation, or debris and deposit an average of 32 to 46 eggs in late June or early July. Incubation requires approximately 60-65 days, and hatching occurs in late August or early September. The tell-tale eye-shine of an alligator (and other nocturnal vertebrates) is caused by a layer of cells called the tapetum lucidum (a Latin phrase meaning "bright carpet"). This structure is located beneath the photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) in the retina and reflects light back into these cells to increase the amount of light detected, which improves an alligator vision in low light conditions. In alligators this eye-shine is red, but it can be different colors in other species.


Georgia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Quail Facts

Georgia's Bobwhite Quail Initiative Transition-Gaining Ground for More Coveys Northern bobwhites hold a special place in Georgia’s outdoor culture and wildlife heritage. In fact, Georgia has been known as a premiere quail-hunting destination for over 100 years and the Georgia General Assembly designated the bobwhite as the State Gamebird in 1970. Back in the quail boom years of the early 20th century, Georgia's landscape was a "sea" of usable habitat for quail due to extensive low intensity farming and forestry with little urban/suburban development. However, Georgia’s quail population has declined by more than 85% since the 1960’s and consequently the number of quail hunters has declined by over 80%. This drastic decline is due primarily to the loss of quality early successional habitat (i.e. native grasses, legumes, weeds, briars, bugs and shrubs). Restoring this habitat type across Georgia’s landscape benefits quail, numerous songbirds, rabbits, wild turkey, deer and many other wildlife species, improves water quality, reduces soil erosion, and can enhance local economies by stimulating quail hunting and wildlife viewing. In response to the quail decline, Georgia’s Board of Natural Resources worked with key members of the General Assembly and other supporters to develop and fund the Bobwhite Quail Initiative (BQI) in 1999. The BQI is a proactive effort directed at restoring quality habitat for bobwhites and other early successional wildlife species on working farms and forestlands. The initial phase of BQI focused efforts in 15-upper coastal plain counties where interested landowners were provided with detailed technical assistance on restoring and managing quail habitat, and on a competitive basis, economic incentives to implement certain habitat management practices (e.g. field borders, hedgerows, thinning and burning pine stands, and fallow corners) to enhance row crop fields and pine stands for bobwhites and other early successional wildlife. 
Website Builder