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British Columbia Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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Deer*Bear*Moose*Goat*Sheep
BC Trophy Mountain Outfitters
Ziggy Greenwood
Ph 250-238-2274
Fax 250-238-2241
Hunters can expect high success rates and good trophy quality with wilderness hunts from BC Trophy Mountain Outfitters’ permanent alpine based camps, spike-based camps, and lodge. We’re solely Canadian-owned and all our licensed guides know our trails, animal habits, and wildlife like the back of their hand. Within our exclusive 2,000 square mile (5,000 square kilometre) territory located in southwestern British Columbia, we hunt 13 primary species including: California bighorn sheep (a subspecies of Rocky Mountain sheep); Canadian and Rocky Mountain goat; grizzly bear, black, colour phase, and cinnamon black bear; Canadian moose (not Shiras moose or Yukon moose); cougar, mountain lion, and puma; mule, whitetail, and blacktail deer; lynx; bobcat; timber wolf; and coyote.
Elk*Deer*Bear*Moose*Goat*Big Horn Sheep*Bison*Mtn Lion*Upland Birds
Fraser River Outfitters
John Sierver
Monte Lake, BC VOE 2NO
Ph 250-375-2550


Vancouver Island and the Coast Mountain range of British Columbia are home to both the largest and highest density of black bears in the world. Join your hosts, John and Kathy Sievers for a true west coast spot and stalk black bear hunting adventure of a lifetime. Just one look in the record books and it's easy to see why Vancouver Island and the Coast Mountain range of British Columbia should be your only choice for trophy black bear. Ideal habitat, mild climates and rivers teaming with spawning salmon allow us to consistently harvest bear of record book quality. Columbia blacktail deer populations along the coastal regions of southern British Columbia and Vancouver Island are flourishing. Not to be confused with their California cousins, these deer are genetically closer related to the Sitka blacktails. Bear, bear & more bear, what can we say. his return in the fall he would tell great stories of giant rams, moose, goat and bear that his clients from all around the world would harvest.
Bear*Moose*Mtn Lion*Bobcat*Goat
High Caliber Adventures
Jamie Reynolds
#1 45507 Watson Road
Chilliwack, BC V2R 2H5
Ph 604-819-2016
A great hunt for those looking for something different. Our coastal mountain black bears take on a different shape than their northern counterparts. With broader front quarters, our bears tend to have more bulk. Explore glacier fed valleys and rugged sidehills while on the hunt for your animal. A great chance at a great animal.This area has an abundance of trophy sized black bear with about fifty percent colour phases from chocolate, cinnamon to blonde. In Spring we hunt valley bottoms where the bear can be found grazing on the fresh shoots of growth. We hunt black bear with river boat for earlier hunts and move to ATV's and trucks for the later hunts. This hunt is mainly spot and stalk. The hunts start in the last week of April and end the 15th of June. These mountains hold many hidden basins where early season deer can be found. We have both Mule Deer and Black Tail Deer in the area as well as Hybrids. Hybrids can be a tremendous species as they will hold traits of both Mule Deer and Black Tail Deer. Come and enjoy the breath taking scenery of the Coast Mountains. With an abundance of mountain goats in this area there are good numbers of mature billy goat.
Bear*Moose*Deer*Mtn Lion*Goat*Bobcat
Adams Lake Outfitters
Laurie Friesen
6243 VLA Road
Chase, BC VOE 1M1
Ph 250-679-8594


The Adams Lake Outfitters territory is located in Central British Columbia in the Shuswap Lake region which is nestled between the Coastal and Rocky Mountain Ranges. We'll guide you on a fantastic wilderness experience in black bear, moose, mule deer, grizzly bear, and predator hunts. Our hunting area offers outstanding opportunities for world-class mule deer hunting. This is prime time when the mule deer are moving from higher elevations and usually coincides with the peak rut. We hunt whitetail deer at lower elevations where we know they reside. Mule deer are hunted in alpine areas and some of our more open drainages. Our hunting area offers outstanding opportunities for world-class mule deer hunting. This is prime time when the mule deer are moving from higher elevations and usually coincides with the peak rut. We hunt whitetail deer at lower elevations where we know they reside. Mule deer are hunted in alpine areas and some of our more open drainages. Our territories include some great moose habitat. Canadian Bulls sporting 40-50 inch antler spreads have been taken   We have a limited number of tags per year, so it is advisable to book your moose hunt early. You can combine your moose hunt with the pursuit of black bear, mule deer or whitetail.

Elk*Deer*Bear*Cougar*Goat
Canadian Black Bear & Roosevelt Elk Hunting
 2678 Weldwood Rd
Powell River BC V8A 0L4

Ph. 604-487-0682

Coastal Inlet Adventures (BC Canadian Black Bear & Roosevelt Elk Hunting) hunts 3,500 miles of Coastal British Columbia in Canada. Most of which is accessible only by boat or float plane. We provide Canadian, British Columbia (BC) hunts for Black Bear, Roosevelt Elk, Black-Tailed Deer, Cougar, and Mountain Goat. As well as the breath taking scenery of the BC Coastal mountains of Western Canada it is common to see whales, porposes, bald eagles, seals, and sea lions in your daily travels. By taking a limited number of clients every year we maintain a high Canadian BC Roosevelt Elk and Black Bear Hunting trophy quality. Our professional guides are dedicated to providing clients with a lasting memory of a great hunting experience. Many return Black Bear and Roosevelt Elk Hunters will attest to this.

FISHING

Walleye*Trout*Bass*Dolly Varden*Pike*Sturgeon
BC Trophy Mountain Outfitters
Ziggy Greenwood
Ph 250-238-2274
Fax 250-238-2241


Whether you’re a trout enthusiast or a novice angler with an urge to hook a magnificent rainbow trout, our remote mountain lakes, rivers, ponds, and streams within our million-acre (400,000 hectare) angling guide territory will fulfil your dreams. Choose daily from a variety of lakes, rivers, and streams for wild rainbow, brook, Dolly Varden trout, and kokanee salmon. Learn the art of fly-fishing from our licensed guides. They’ll teach you lake and stream fishing techniques and casting skills through both wet and dry fly presentations.
Sturgeon*Salmon*Trout
High Caliber Adventures
Jamie Reynolds
#1 45507 Watson Road
Chilliwack, BC V2R 2H5
Ph 604-819-2016


Experience in the Beautiful Fraser Valley!Come for angling experience of a lifetime. Fish for salmon, trout, or our monstrous “great” white sturgeon on the mighty Fraser River, located just onehour away from Vancouver, BC, Canada.Staying right on the river in our deluxe bar camps, you’ll be able to step right up from the kitchen table and into the action as you relax in style. Situated on a very productive bar in the Fraser River, you’ll have great opportunities at one of the many salmon runs during this time of year.
FlyFishing*Trout*Grayling
Travel Adventures-Spatsizi Fly Fishing
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Phone 585-360-1812

Spatsizi Adventures offers a true wilderness experience. Here is a frontier organization located in one of the most remote areas in British Columbia, Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness Park, offering a unique wilderness setting with no competition from other lodges. Spatsizi Lodge is the only lodge in Spatsizi Park. The daily fly outs use two Cessna 185 float planes stationed at the Lodge. Experience a new river or lake every day! Dine riverside on freshly caught trout cooked to perfection by your congenial guide.


British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters

British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
British Columbia Outfitters
Trail Rides*Pack Trips*Guide School
BC Trophy Mountain Outfitters
Ziggy Greenwood
Ph 250-238-2274
Fax 250-238-2241


Turn your hunt into a family or inter-generational vacation by bringing you child, grandchild, or spouse. We offer a safe and fun-learning environment where they can participate, as much or as little as they want, on your trophy hunting adventures. Our comfortable hunt lodge sleeps 6, provides three homemade meals each day, and offers many non-hunter experience add-ons suited to the seasons. We provide a safe and fun learning environment to gain a deeper appreciation of nature and resource management. View grizzlies on a spring black bear hunt, go predator viewing in the winter with some snowmobiling, or horseback riding in the fall. Or, non-hunters can also just relax at our lodge, sipping hot chocolate by the fireplace with a good book from our library.
   

Cross Country Skiing
BC Trophy Mountain Outfitters
Ziggy Greenwood
Ph 250-238-2274
Fax 250-238-2241
The permanent base camps include log cabins and/or tent cabins with cooking facilities. The tent cabins are 10x12 “walk about” structures with raised floors for sleeping. The more developed permanent camps have solar-lighting, heaters in tent cabins, wooden bed frames with sleep pads, and gravity-fed showers. The seasonal camps consist of tent cabins for cooking and sleeping, wood stoves, sleeping pads, and outhouse.
   


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Elk Facts

The Elk is the second largest member of the deer family with slender legs, a thick neck and is colored brown or tan with darker underparts. The antlers, only grown by male elk, are large with many tines, the main beam up to 150 cm long. The Elk occurs in high, open mountain pastures in summer and lower, wooded slopes or dense woods in the winter. Elk are most abundant along the western side of the rockies but they also can be found near Golden, Bush River, Forest Lake, Lucerne area, Seebach Creek, Pear River area, and Tuchodi Lake area. The elk are nocturnal creature is primarily a grazer feeding on woody vegetation and lichen. Once the velvet of his elk antlers has been discarded, the bull begins assembling his harem of up to 60 cows. The gestation period is 255-275 days. The elk main predator is the mountain lion and sometimes bear get the young. An elk calf weighs about 35 pounds and can gain two pounds a day for the first few weeks. At the start of its first winter, an elk may weigh five times as much as when it was born. Cow elk can weigh more than 500 pounds, stand 4-1/2 feet at the shoulder, and measure 6-1/2 feet from nose to rump. An average bull weighs 700 pounds, stands 5 feet at the shoulder, and measures more than 8 feet from nose to rump. Elk and other members of the deer family belong to a group of animals called ungulates, Elk begin growing antlers from bony bumps on their skulls called pedicles. Increasing daylight elevates the level of the hormone testosterone in the animal's blood, which triggers the growth of antlers. Antlers begin as layer upon layer of cartilage that slowly mineralizes into bone. They are light and easily damaged until they completely mineralize in late summer. A soft covering called velvet helps protect the antlers and carries blood to the growing bone tissue. If you look closely at a deer or elk antler, you'll see grooves and ridges on it. These mark the paths of veins that carried blood throughout the growing antlers. The blood stops flowing to the antlers in August, the antlers finish hardening, and the velvet falls off or is rubbed off. The hardened antlers are composed of calcium, phosphorous and as much as 50 percent water. Elk and other members of the deer family eat tough plants such as grass or twigs that most other mammals can't digest. Both Roosevelt elk and Rocky Mt.  Elk occur i n  British Columbia.  Roosevelt elk are found on Vancouver  Island  and the  Rocky Mountain elk  on  the  mainland and on Graham Island.  The  elk population i n  the  Province is estimated a t  23,000,  The East Kootenay area comprises about 5%  of  the land area of the Province but  supports about 60%  of  the elk population.  The annual hunter take of  elk is between 1,500  and 1,600  animals. Roosevelt elk u n t i l about our.years ago when a program was initiated t o  investigate logging-elk  relationships and inventory techniques. Elk  have been  introduced  i n   many  locations  throughout  the  Province.  These introductions have resulted i n  the establishment of  elk populations in  the following areas: Graham  Island,  Lytton, Adams River, Okanagan Region  (Princeton,  Christina.  Most of these populations are now  supporting  hunting  seasons and providing recreation to the  Province's hunters and enjoyment of others who have the opportunity to view elk. In some instances, the elk introductions have led to complaints from ranchers about elk depredation on irrigated pasture and fences, however, liberalized seasons have eliminated or usually reduced the depredation t o  an acceptable level. Relationship regarding  elk  management  w i t h   the  Ministry  o f   Forests,  the  single most  important  land  use  agency  i n  the  Province  has been greatly improved in recent years especially in the  East Kootenays through coordinated  resource  management planning.  Coordinated resource management plans have  benefited elk populations. Approximately 500 miles of  elk fence have been constructed to provide better control and distribution of livestock grazing over more than 500,000 hectares  of  open and timbered range occupied by elk i n the East Kootenay.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

Deer are a tan or reddish-brown in the summer and greyish-brown in the winter, the belly, throat, nose band, eye ring and insides of the ears are white. There are black spots on the sides of the chin. The deer antlers have individual tines that grow upward from each of the main beams. The mule deer has the widest distribution of the deer found in British Columbia, occurring as far north as the Liard River Valley and throughout the interior as far west as the coast mountains. The whitetail deer resides in the lower south-east corner of the province. Found only in BC is the Northwest Whitetail deer. Deer are browsers rather than grazers and feed on a variety of vegetation including green plants, nuts and corn, and trees and twigs. Although the deer is a good swimmer and runner (reaching speeds of 35 mph) it falls prey to a number of animals including the cougar, domestic dog, wolf, coyote, lynx, bobcat and bear. Once this species was endangered but it is now more abundant than ever. The mule deer has a distinct "bound" in which all four feet come down together as if on springs. The deer tracks will vary from a rough "V-shape" while running to a straight line with slower speeds. The track varies according to the surrounding landscape. In soft, woodland areas the print is more pointed and on harder ground where the hoof may be worn, the track may appear with a blunt tip. Mule deer and Black-tailed deer are both members of the same specie, yet they are very different from one another. In British Columbia, these two subspecies or races are the most widespread members of the deer family and probably the most familiar. Black-tailed Deer have been around in North America for over two million years. Mule Deer may have appeared later as a hybrid of Black-tailed and White-tailed deer. Since then, at least seven races or subspecies of Mule and Black-tailed deer have developed. When ice covered British Columbia. Blacktail deer are excellent swimmers and inhabit most islands except the more far-flung Queen Charlottes and Dundas group and a few smaller islands closer in. Sitka blacktail deer were introduced into the Queen Charlotte Islands  in the early 1900s and have flourished there because of the lack of predators, except Black Bear, and the mild winters. Black-tailed Deer numbers vary greatly depending on habitat conditions, the severity of the winters, and the number of predators. However, hunter harvests and other counts indicate that the population in British Columbia has fluctuated between 150,000 and 250,000 in recent decades. Blacktails are abundant in southern areas where the climate is favorable. During most of the year Black-tailed and Mule deer travel alone or in small groups, but Mule Deer sometimes form larger groups. The social system consists of clans of females that are related to each other by maternal descent and bucks that are not related.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

Black Bear in the west is black to cinnamon with a white blaze on the chest and in the east, black. On Gribble Island and the neighbouring mainland of British Columbia individuals are nearly white. The snout is tan or grizzled with a straight or slightly convex profile. Average weight is 200-600 pounds. Black Bear inhabit heavily forested areas, dense bush and wooded mountains throughout most of British Columbia. They tend to wander a great distance, some male adults having lifetime ranges of 500 to 620 square miles. Bear cubs are born in January to early February generally every second year. The Black Bear young weigh only one-half a pound at birth. This uniquely North American bear is generally nocturnal and solitary. It is classed as a carnivore although most of its diet consists of vegetation such as twigs, buds, leaves, nuts, roots, various fruits, corn and berries. They are also good fisherman and feed on spawning salmon. Before winter it puts on a great supply of fat, then holes up for the winter in a sheltered place. Hunting Black Bear is a popular sport. Black bear are listed in BC, which means they are neither endangered nor vulnerable. They are listed because individual black bear are highly variable in size and color and some black bear are similar in appearance to some threatened or endangered species of world bear, such as the Malaysian sun bear. British Columbia and Ontario have the largest populations of black bear of all the provinces. In British Columbia, black bear are found throughout the province. They are the only large mammal in the province that occupies every ecosection. The estimates that 10,000 to 13,000 Grizzly bear live in British Columbia; conservative estimates which are being corroborated by active research at 20 different research sites in the province. Current grizzly bear populations in areas such as the Kootenays, Northern Rockies, and Northwestern BC are very healthy. The bear population in the southeast, which is shared by Alberta and Montana, has been hunted continuously by non-natives for nearly 200 years and by First Nations people for uncounted generations.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Caribou Facts

British Columbia, boreal caribou live in the far northeast corner of the province. This rugged area consists of old-growth forest rich in lichens, which the caribou feed on in the winter, and is speckled with lakes, rivers and marshes. Caribou is brown, shaggy fur with a whitish neck and mane. The muzzle is large and blunt with short and broad ears and a short tail. Large, crescent shaped hooves which have sharp edges ensure good footing. The antlers of adult male Caribou are massive compared to those of the female and are erect and spreading with flattened brow tines that point forward and downward over the forehead. Caribou inhabits the arctic tundra, alpine tundra and northern boreal forests of North America, Russia, Norway, Sweden and Finland. In the European countries, Caribou are called reindeer. They reside throughout all of British Columbia in the Coast Mountains to the Rockies and in the Columbia, Selkirk and Monashee Mountain ranges. Caribou species is among the most migratory of all animals. Caribou feed on lichens, mushrooms, grasses, sedges and other green plants in the summer and twigs, horsetails, and willow in the winter. Caribou are great swimmers and run at speeds of up to 50 mph. The spongy foot pads provide traction on boggy summer tundra and in the winter when the pads have shrunk, hardened and are covered with tufts of hair, the hoof rim bites into ice or crusted snow to prevent slipping. Woodland Caribou are a species of deer. They are associated with northern, cold and snowy climates.  Woodland Caribou in B.C. include three ecotypes or groups adapted to specific habitats.  These include: Boreal Caribou, Northern Caribou and Mountain Caribou.  All three appear to be declining and face significant impacts to their habitat from both land use and climate change in B.C. and beyond. For caribou conservation to succeed, the support of all stakeholders is needed. With leadership from the governments of Canada and British Columbia; First Nations, the forest industry, other industries, and other groups are working to reduce impacts to caribou and their habitat. Boreal Caribou are found only in the extreme northeastern corner of the province.  They live in low elevation open forests and boggy sites next to wetlands. They depend on ground lichens as their primary winter food.  Like all caribou, Boreal Caribou are considered an umbrella species.  This means  management activities to protect Boreal Caribou can benefit many other species that live in the boreal forest.Northern Caribou are the most common type in B.C. with populations extending from west-central to northern B.C.  Like Boreal Caribou, they also depend on a winter diet of ground lichens, but these populations are associated with alpine areas during calving and either low elevation pine forests or wind-swept ridges in winter.Mountain Caribou are found only in British Columbia except for one population that extends into the United States (eastern Washington and Northern Idaho).  Mountain Caribou depend on lichens that grow on trees as their primary winter food and spend winters in higher elevation, old growth forests.  Two southern populations of Mountain Caribou have recently been lost, and a further 11 have fewer than 100 animals each. Boreal Caribou habitat is being altered by industrial land use, agriculture, climate change, and large scale fires.  Changes to habitat are particularly affecting caribou survival. Mountain Caribou are threatened by four main factors including habitat alteration, predators,disturbance and climate change.  Forest harvesting, fire, human settlement, roads and reservoirs have all altered habitat.  Current trends in Northern Caribou require more detailed study.  Primary threats vary between populations, but include habitat alteration and mining. Numbers of Mountain Caribou have historically been limited by predators, but similar to Boreal Caribou, habitat alterations tend to favour other more abundant deer species.  These other deer species help to support higher wolf and cougar populations which also prey on Mountain Caribou.  Wolverines, Grizzly Bear and Black Bear are also predators of mountain caribou.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Goat Facts

British Columbia, we are very fortunate to live in some of the best mountain goat country in the world. We count on seeing mountain goat every time we hike in the local mountains.The Mountain Goat, a blunt, squarish-looking animal has a narrow head with slender, black, shiny horns rising in a backward curve to a length of 10-12 inches. The goat is white and on the chin is a double beard of long hair. Weighing an average of 150-300 pounds and reaching heights of 35-45 inches, the mountain goat is sure-footed and agile due to its hooves with cushioned skid-proof pads for grip. The mountain goat lives in rocky mountainous areas above the timberline throughout parts of North America. British Columbia's goat population is by far the largest at approximately 100,000. This mountain goat feeds on alpine grasses and flowers to almost any tree and shrub. The rutting season occurs between November and early January and the young (often twins) is born in May or June. The mountain goat is a very unique mammal. Their ability to climb and travel on steep rock cliffs is superior to all other large mammals and keeps them safe from predators. Mountain goat survive winter temperatures down to -50 C and wind to 90 kph along with deep snow, avalanches, rock falls and ice. Mountain goat have survived extreme conditions during  ice ages in western North America over the last 40,000 years. The world population of mountain goat is low - estimated at less than 110,000 so we have to pay close attention to make sure that mountain goat survive any disruption by humans. The mountain goat population is spread out over a very large area in British Columbia and many of the herds are isolated from other goat herds. If we assume an average herd size of 20 mountain goat, there are 2500 herds in BC. If 40% of the total land area in the province is mountainous terrain suitable for goat then the calculated average land area for each herd is 151 square kilometers. Of course, goat herds are closer in some areas and further apart in others but this calculation gives an idea of the isolation of individual herds. Mountain goat are gregarious and have a strong social structure. The main herd is made up of mature females, new-born and young males and females less than three years of age. The leader of the herd is often the oldest female. The goat herd usually numbers between 5 and 30. There is a pecking order within the herd from the oldest female down to the newest kid. The goat herd always stays together but each goat will show some aggression toward lower ranked members over the best feed or the best resting spot. Mountain goat do not butt heads but instead approach sideways head to tail and threaten to gore the belly and hind quarters. The home range of a mountain goat herd in our area is typically nine kilometers of connecting alpine ridges. There can be numerous herds of goat on various watersheds of a single large mountain range. Mountain goat do not migrate out of their home range but they do move up and down the mountain according to feed and weather. They will move high to cool off on hot summer days. Goat will stay high to keep in the wind away from mosquitoes and blackflies. Goat will move to ridges in winter where the wind scours the snow and reveals  lichens, grasses and sedges for feed. They will move down to treeline in stormy wet weather and again late in the winter to feed on coniferous trees. Goat will feed in low elevation meadows clear of snow early in spring and then move up the mountain as the snow melts and the slopes green up.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Lion Facts

The mountain lion is a large animal with fur that is short and reddish-brown to grey-brown with white on the underside; the tail is black-tipped. The head is fairly small with small, rounded ears and large feet. The average adult male lion weighs 125 pounds and the female 100 pounds. The lion is the largest wild cat native to British Columbia. The mountain lion occurs in BC from the Canada/USA border to Big Muddy River on the Alaska Highway. Although they have not yet reached the Queen Charlotte Islands, they can be found on most other coastal islands. This mountain lion is found only in the western hemisphere of the Americas generally in mountainous areas. The mountain lion is a strong, solitary, strongly territorial hunting species that requires an undisturbed game-rich wilderness. They feed on large animals to mice; the cougar is capable of killing a 600 pound moose or elk. An adult male lion needs no more than 14-20 mule deer per year to survive. The female mountain lion has a distinct scream that has been described as "nerve-wracking, demoniac, terror-striking, a trilling wail".


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Wolf Facts

The grey wolf is a grizzled grey but colour varies from white to black. The ears are erect and the tail is bushy and black tipped. The male is larger than the female and average weight is 55-130 pounds. The grey wolf, also known as the timber wolf, prefers the open tundra and forests of British Columbia. Although they once inhabited most of North America, now distribution occurs in only Alaska, Canada, and parts of the U.S.A. Human fear, superstition, and outright hatred of this animal decreased its population drastically and eradicated it from 50% of its former range. The wolf is a very social animal who mates for life and lives in packs of 2-15. The strongest male is usually the pack leader; all members of the pack care for the young.


British Columbia Hunting Outfitters and Guides Moose Facts

Estimated moose population for British Columbia is around 175,000. The moose is a horse-sized animal is the largest member of the deer family with long, dark brown hair, high, humped shoulders and long legs. A pendant of hair-covered skin sometimes reaching 2 feet hangs under the throat. Each April the male moose or bull grows a set of antlers reaching 120-150 cm which he loses in the winter after rutting season. The moose occurs in spruce forests, swamps, aspen and willow thickets; it is built to live in rough country and is well adapted to a cold climate. Moose can be found throughout most of B.C. The rut lasts from early September to late October and 8 months later 1-2 calves are born. Moose are unpredictable and sometimes dangerous; although they generally avoid human contact, cows with calves and rutting bulls have been known to charge people, cars, horses and locomotives. Moose are powerful swimmers, sometimes diving 5.5 metres or more for plants at the bottom of a lake. Moose swimming in the water is also a way for them to cool off in the summer, as moose suffer from the heat. They do, however, tolerate cold well. Moose can also travel through practically any terrain. Their long, stilt-like legs make it easy for them to travel over deadfall trees and deep snow. Their large hooves provide support to wade through soft muskeg and snow. Despite the moose large size and broad antlers, it can travel silently through the forest. The moose eyesight is poor, but they compensate for it with a good sense of smell and hearing. Moose live on the margins of lakes, muskegs and streams of the boreal forest, on the rocky, wooded hillsides of the western mountain ranges and now even northward through the transition forest that extends to the open tundra. Moose can be found in Canadian forests from the eastern tip to the border of Alaska. A moose antlers are pale in color, sometimes almost white. They are used for fighting in the hunting season. It is in the late summer and autumn that a mature bull moose carries its rack of antlers, which normally span between 120 and 150 centimetres. They begin growing in midsummer and are soft and spongy during that period of growth, with blood vessels running through them. By late August or early September the moose antlers are fully developed, hard and bony. The formerly soft velvet dries and the bulls rub it off against tree trunks. Adult bull moose normally shed their antlers in November, but younger bulls can carry them through until April. Moose can be a variety of colors, ranging from dark brown, almost black, to reddish or greyish brown, with grey or white leg markings, called stockings.
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