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Alberta Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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Elk*Deer*Moose*Big Horn Sheep*Bear*Wolves
Chungo Creek Outfitters
Greg & Diane Kristoff
Box 32
Nordegg, AB Canada
Ph 403-844-3368
Ph 403-846-6834
Chungo Creek Outfitters is a family owned/operated hunting and trail ride operation located northwest from the town of Nordegg, Alberta. Nestled against the eastern boundary of Jasper National Park this is home to excellent populations of Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep, Moose, Elk, Mule Deer, Whitetail Deer, Wolves, Bears and other mammals. The scenery in this area is unsurpassed any where in the world. At Chungo Creek we have a base camp complete with horse handling facilities and cabins that we rent. Elk hunts are conducted in zone 430. Dates are Sept 17-Nov. 30 . Elk populations are not extremely high but the numbers usually increase later in the season when they move out of the alpine regions. Mule deer hunts are conducted in zone 434. Mule deer populations are high with several bucks in the 20 in. range available. To harvest the bigger Mule deer bucks you will need to pass on several of these smaller deer, Big Horn sheep hunting is done from our main camp and spike tent camps located in zone 434. The sheep population is currently very good and you can expect to see sheep every day. In the last several years clients have had 100% opportunity on legal rams.
Elk*Deer*Bear*Moose
Anchor D Guiding & Outfitting LTD
Dewy & Jan Matthews
Box 656
Black Diamond, AB
Canada T0L 0H0
Ph 403-933-2867
Fax 403-933-2255
 
We feature guided horseback hunting for Elk, Mule Deer, Whitetail Deer, Shiras Moose, and Black Bear. Our ranch is 50 miles southwest of Calgary, Alberta, Canada and our hunting territory starts in the Alberta foothills, on the edge of the ranch, and goes west and south to the Continental Divide which makes up the Alberta / British Columbia border in the Canadian Rockies. This area roughly comprises about 1200 square miles of elk hunting area, all very mountainous and prime habitats for Deer, Elk, Moose and Black Bear. For those that want a bit more luxury, we also offer mule deer hunting or mule deer/whitetail deer hunting combinations out of the ranch. It is still an incredible horseback hunt in high country. Mule deer hunting season starts one week after the start of elk hunting season. All of my elk / mule deer hunting combination hunts are one on one horseback hunts.
Elk*Deer*Big Horn Sheep
Guinn Outfitters LTD
Box 44
Kananaskis Village, AB
Canada T0L 2H0
Ph 403-591-7171
Ph 403-591-7575
Fax 403-591-7326
Guinn Outfitters is based in the heart of the Alberta Rockies in the special area of Kananaskis Country at Boundary Ranch. Our site, Boundary Ranch is situated one and a half hour drive west of Calgary. Our deer hunts are limited to 16 hunters spread over the month of November. Spot and stalk is the normal hunting method with a little stand hunting. With very little hunting pressure, deer can be seen throughout the day. A normal day one might see well in excess of 100 Whitetail and half as many Mule Deer. This hunting zone has one of the largest elk populations in the province. Our deer hunts are limited to 16 hunters spread over the month of November. Spot and stalk is the normal hunting method with a little stand hunting. With very little hunting pressure, deer can be seen throughout the day. This hunting zone has one of the largest elk populations in the province. Our total permit numbers for this ranch are 3 rifle and 5 archery per year, so advance booking is a must. Alberta is known for producing big rams and our archery area is no exception. Wildlife management area #410 is the Canmore bow only area, the only area in the province that gives non-residents the opportunity to hunt Bighorn Sheep during the rut (November).
Moose*Bison*Wolf*Coyote*Waterfowl
Blue Sky Outfitters
Kevin McNeil
Box 427
McLennan, AB T0H 2L0
Ph 780-324-2080
Canada geese, Snow geese and Speckled geese stop to fuel up for their long flight south and Mallard ducks, Pintails and Widgeons stage in the thousands in the peace parklands. Our hunting area in McLennan, Alberta is indisputably one of the premier waterfowl hunting areas in North America! According to the Head Biologist of North Western Alberta. Our moose hunts are a fun, exciting hunt in an area that has a very high population of moose. This is a a physically easy hunt with 90% to 100% success rate on 35 to 45 inch wide bulls with the possibility for a 50 inches. The bison hunt is exhilarating and can be hard work. Expect temperatures to be cold in February and March -40F to +10F.
   
FISHING

Trout*Dolly Varden*Whitefish
Chungo Creek Outfitters
Greg & Diane Kristoff
Box 32
Nordegg, AB Canada
Ph 403-844-3368
Ph 403-846-6834
We have some of the best back country stream and lakes in North America. Bull Trout, "Dolly Varden", Cutthroat, Brown Trout, Brook Trout, Rocky Mountain White Fish.
Trout
Travel Adventures-Calgary and the Bow River
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Ph 585-360-1812

The Bow River while using the Shangarry Bed & Breakfast as you home away from home. The Bow offers a myriad of opportunities as it changes character on its journey from a freestone river in the wilds of Banff National Park to a somewhat tamer tail water upon passing through Calgary. The lower Bow River then provides 55 kilometers of nutrient rich water below the city of Calgary which is renowned for the size and abundance of catchable-sized home to monster browns, turbo-powered rainbows, and an incredible summer caddis hatch.
RAFTING

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BIKING

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HIKING

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TRAIL RIDE

Cattle Drives*Horsemanship Clinics*Vacation Packages
Bent Creek Western Vacations
Gerry & Kathy Karchuk
Box 542
Fort Macleod, AB
Canada TOL OZO
Ph 866-553 3974
Fax 403-553 3781
 
 Come share a passion for horses, better horsemanship and wide open spaces. Experience a lifestyle surrounded by horses, cattle and abundant wildlife. Join a limited number of guests experiencing a more personalized all-inclusive guest ranch vacation.
Cowboy with us as we move cattle in a river valley or rolling hill pastures. Lend a hand doctoring calves. Live your dream and participate in a real cattle drive.
Whether a beginner or advanced rider, rediscover Western riding. Non-resistance horse handling techniques are applicable to multiple equine activities. Learn to "tune in" to the subtle yet well expressed language of the horse ... it's a journey of a lifetime!
As a certified instructor and coach, Gerry integrates practical ranch horse and cattle handling experience with tried and true teaching techniques. We welcome you to a quality learning experience you deserve.

Trail Rides*Pack Trips
Chungo Creek Outfitters
Greg & Diane Kristoff
Box 32
Nordegg, AB Canada
Ph 403-844-3368
Ph 403-846-6834
Want the feel of a horse and the old time adventures of riding through the unspoiled Rocky Mountains.You will be given a gentle, experienced horse trained to take you safely along the Rocky Mountain Trails.  Just sit back and enjoy the beautiful vistas and the multitudes of wildlife along the way. Our mountain rides are available from June through August and range from hourly to one day, six day, twelve, and fourteen day adventures. 
Trail Rides*Pack Trips*Hay Rides
Anchor D Guiding & Outfitting LTD
Dewy & Jan Matthews
Box 656
Black Diamond, AB
Canada T0L 0H0
Ph 403-933-2867
Fax 403-933-2255
Anchor D has enjoyed offering overnight horseback riding vacations and trail rides to our guests for over 26 years. Have a look and choose which ride suits you the best and be sure to contact us with any questions you may have.
Cattle Drives*Branding Cattle*Horseback Riding
Lucasia Ranch Vacations
Wayne & Judy Lucasia
Box 1206
Claresholm, AB
Canada TOL OTO
Ph 403-625-2295
Fax 403-625-3126
If you are looking for a true Alberta Canada Working Ranch experience, head back in time to Historic Lucasia Ranch. Join ranch cowboys as they herd cattle through the picturesque Porcupine Hills of southwestern Alberta. Surround yourself with 4000 acres of vast open country, which comprises the impressive Lucasia Ranch. Herds of elk and deer mingle with Texas Longhorns and Crossbred cattle, as well as Percheron, Appaloosa and Quarter horses. Established in 1881 by Colonel Lyndon, our Alberta Foothills Ranch stands as testament to a bygone era. After a day in the saddle, you can spend the evening beside a crackling campfire or relaxing on our deck. Taste the crystal clear spring water that flows through our ranchyard into a pond that is home to colourful ducks and geese. Join our family as they go about the daily Alberta Ranch activities.
Trail Rides*Pack Trips
Boundary Ranch
Rick & Denise Guinn
Box 44
Kananaskis Village Resort, AB
Canada TOL 2HO
Ph 877-591-7177
Fax 403-591-7326
Ideally located in the spectacular natural beauty of Kananaskis Valley, Boundary Ranch is perfect to discover the adventure and serenity of a Canadian tradition; a trail ride in the Rockies! En route, pristine views, flowered alpine meadows and abundant wildlife are just a few of the scenic wonders you’ll experience. Safe – and a photographer’s delight – horseback guided tours are sure to be a highlight of your holiday. Happy Trails!
   
   
WINTER

Sleigh Rides*Hay Rides
Anchor Guiding & Outfitting LTD
Dewy & Jan Matthews
Box 656
Black Diamond, AB
Canada T0L 0H0
Ph 403-933-2867
Fax 403-933-2255
We have hay and sleigh rides available all winter long. Our teams of Belgians and Percherons will pull up to 15 people on a wagon or sleigh for an hour of exhillarating fun. If there’s enough snow, we also have an olymic calibre toboggan hill for your pleasure…Bring your family and friends for an afternoon of great times and wonderful memories. You can bring hot chocolate, hot dogs, or whatever you like, to put on the grill over the fire. Firepit and wood included
   


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guides Deer Facts

The most common mountain deer, Mule Deer have a tawny coat with a light underside and rump. They usually have a light nose with a black tip. They are often confused with the Whitetail deer, but their large ears help to distinguish the two species. Also, despite the name, Whitetail deer actually have a brown tail (it is white underneath). Mule Deer, on the other hand, DO have a white tail, which is tipped with black. Their antlers are also very different. The antlers of Mule Deer begin with a single branch or tine. This will fork to create a y-junction. Each fork of the "y" may also branch to form an additional y-junction, and so on. Whitetail deer antlers begin with a single tine off of which numerous branches emerge.Mule Deer also have a bounding gait, with long leaps exceeding 6 m (20 feet) in length. Mule Deer eat a wide variety of grasses, forbs and leaves. Near summers end, leaves form a principal food source, with the diet moving to twigs, buds and branches. Lichens may be eaten. Mule Deer must be constantly vigilant for cougar, wolves, black and grizzly bears and even lynx (which may take newborn fawns). Their large mule-like ears act like parabolic microphones, enabling the deer to hear almost anything occurring in the immediate area. This western deer is found throughout the Canadian and American Rockies. It is the principal mountain deer, and is much more common in the high countryThis deer is tan or reddish-brown in the summer and grayish-brown in the winter, with certain areas remaining white all year round. Fawns are spotted with brown tails and a white underside. When sensing danger, the deer raises its tail – this is called ‘flagging.’ Showing this large white patch on the underside of the tail signals an alarm to other deer and helps a fawn follow its mother to safety. The white-tailed deer is the most widely distributed of North America’s large mammals. It can be found as far south as the southern tip of North America, and as far north as Great Slave Lake in Northwest Territories, Canada. It also spreads as far east as Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia to as far west as southern British Columbia. The deer is a great jumper and runner. It can reach speeds of up to 58 kilometres per hour. Like a cow, the white-tailed deer’s stomach has four compartments. This allows food to be processed more efficiently and means that the deer can feed on things that other mammals cannot process.


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guides Elk Facts

In Alberta, elk are found mainly in the foothills and mountains, and in Elk Island National Park and Cypress Hills Provincial Park. They migrate from high summer ranges to winter ranges in lower mountain valleys and foothills. Elk prefer areas of woodland mixed with open grassland. Such habitat is found at forest edges and in mountain meadows. Elk usually graze on forbs and grasses, although they will browse on aspen bark and twigs in winter when food is scarce. Elk are the only members of the deer family in Alberta that collect harems. During the rut, elk bulls use their antlers to challenge each other for possession of cows. The rut lasts from late August through September, occasionally to mid October. Spotted caIves are born the following spring. The name "elk" originated with early European settlers in the United States, who confused it with the European elk, which is a close relative of our moose. North American elk are more closely related to the European red deer. Elk are often called "wapiti," the Shawnee word for "white rump." This description refers to the prominent, cream-colored rump patch. There are few big game animals that captivate the human imagination like that of a Rocky Mountain bull Elk. The mere sight of elk bugling on a misty September morning, or thrusting its way through chest-deep snow in mid-November is enough to make some elk hunters abandon all trace of common sense and go to extremes to harvest one of the magnificent beasts. Elk hunting is never easy, but the rewards for patience and perseverance are high. A six-point or better bull Elk placed conspicuously on the trophy-room wall is true testament to a hunter's prowess. Alberta has a growing population of Elk,  that numbers in the neighborhood of 26,000 animals. Elk are found predominantly along the eastern shadow of the Rocky Mountain zones, and in the high basins of the Foothill zones, although in recent years elk have been expanding their range into the forested Northern Boreal zones and Parkland zones. The elk are nocturnal creature is primarily a grazer, feeding on woody vegetation and lichen. Once the velvet of his antlers has been discarded, the bull Elk begins assembling his harem of up to 60 cows. The gestation period for calves is 255-275 days. The Elk's main predator is the mountain lion, and sometimes bears consume the young. Elk are found throughout the Rockies, and are one of the most popular animals in Banff and Jasper National Parks. Recently, park wardens in Banff have begun to forcibly evict the Elk from within the town site in an attempt to return the Bow Valley to a more natural predator-prey regime, Several hundred Elk were removed in the winter of 1999-2000, and an aggressive program of aversive conditioning is being used to discourage the remaining Elk from hanging around Banff town site.Elk are not very fussy when it comes to diet. Elk eat a variety of grasses, flowers, and herbs. Elk are particularly fond of anything that comes in a planter, making them the bane of gardeners in Banff and Jasper. In the winter, elk may strip the bark off of aspen trees, leaving a dark scar on the otherwise lightly colored bark.


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guides Sheep Facts

Dall sheep are typically all white in color, although a few black hairs on the tail are not uncommon. The white coat is an adaptation, or special trait that helps them survive. Dall sheep typically move to lower altitudes in the winter, but predators are more numerous there. The white coat helps the sheep go unseen against the snow by predators. In the summer months, their coat does not change color, but stays white. They are still protected, however, because they move to steep and rocky cliffs where predators are hard-pressed to follow.  Dall sheep walk on two toes which places them in the “even-toed” group of ungulates similar to giraffes, deer, and camels. Hooves are another adaptation that enable Dall sheep to live on rocky, steep terrain. Their toes are flexible and able to adjust to the uneven surfaces in their mountain habitats where sure footing is essential.  Dall sheep feed primarily on grasses and sedges. In the winter they actually eat frozen grass, stems, lichen, and moss. Sheep will often travel to mineral licks to eat soil. These are typically rocky outcrops where high concentrations of minerals are pooled. Dall sheep have well developed social systems. Adult rams live in bands, or groups, associated with ewe groups during the mating season. Since Dall sheep are very loyal to their social group, they have very specific home ranges. Almost all sheep outfitting in Alberta is done in the old time style, with packhorses and tent frame camps. The exception is an archery-only sheep zone near Canmore, where much of the hunting is easily accessed on foot. These November sheep hunts can be bitterly cold. During the rifle season in September and October, most of the outfitters book 14-day hunts. The seasoned sheep hunter knows that there will be long days in the saddle and that the climbing will be tough on legs and feet. It is absolutely essential to get the body in shape for sheep hunting and it is probably just as important to toughen up the mind. A great attitude is important to survive a long sheep hunt in the mountains.It takes long hours of looking to find sheep, and you have to resolve to hang around until as late as possible before leaving the mountain for camp. All the rules of safety must be observed and these preparations are as important as mental and physical conditioning. A Trophy Sheep is a male bighorn sheep with horns, one of which is of sufficient size that a straight line drawn from the most anterior point of the base of the horn to the tip of the horn extends beyond the anterior edge of the eye when viewed in profile. A Full-Curl Trophy Sheep is a male bighorn sheep with horns, one of which is of sufficient size that when viewed in profile, its tip extends upward beyond a straight line drawn from the rear-most point of the base of the horn to the centre of the nostril. In Canada, there are two species of mountain sheep, each with two subspecies. The larger species is the bighorn sheep, The two subspecies of bighorn sheep are Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, which occur in the Canadian Rockies, and the smaller California bighorn sheep that inhabit the arid ranges of south-central British Columbia. The other species of mountain sheep is called thinhorn or Dall sheep, which occurs in northern British Columbia, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Here, we will focus on bighorn sheep. North American wild sheep are believed to descend from primitive sheep, similar to present-day Marco Polo sheep of central Asia, that migrated here 500,000 years ago via the Bering land bridge that once joined the regions now known as Russia and Alaska. When the glaciers of the last ice age spread southward, the sheep became separated into two relatively ice-free areas, one in central Alaska and the other south of the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The Alaska sheep evolved into the Dall sheep, and the more southerly sheep evolved into the heavier-horned Rocky Mountain and California bighorn sheep. As the glaciers retreated between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago, the bighorn sheep expanded their range to include British Columbia and Alberta, as well as other areas of the United States.An important requirement for bighorn sheep habitat is escape territory, such as rocky cliffs and outcrops, which allows the animals to avoid predators such as wolf, bear and bobcats. They avoid dense forests. Also, the sheep tend to stay within two kilometres of a water source. Home ranges are quite large, averaging nearly 17 square kilometres.


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guides Moose Facts

Moose have a life span of 15 to 25 years and the average moose weighs between 550 to 700 kilograms. Moose are the largest member of the deer family and the flap of skin that hangs beneath a moose's throat is called a bell. Only males have a rack of antlers. They are flattened and range from 120 to 150 centimetres across and weigh 20 kilograms. Their antlers may have as many as 30 tines (or spikes). Moose live in every Canadian province.Moose are very good swimmers and can easily swim 16 kilometres and Moose can run faster than 50 kilometres per hour. Having poor eyesight, moose rely on their keen sense of smell.A male moose is called a bull and a female moose is called a cow and the word moose comes from the Algonquin word mooswa, which means "twig-eater." Moose eat willow, birch and aspen twigs, horsetail, sedges, roots, pond weeds and grasses, leaves, twigs, buds and the bark of some woody plants, as well as lichens, aquatic plants and some of the taller herbaceous land plants. Moose can feed under water and they can dive more than five metres for food on a lake bottom. It is estimated that there are between 500,000 and 1 million moose in Canada. Moose are large even-toed herbivorous mammals, the largest of the deer family and Moose vary in size and shape. Their color varies from a little brown to a dusty black depending on the season and age of the animal. Calves, in comparison, are often a light rusty color. Moose have long, lighter-colored legs with the front pair longer than the hind ones. Other features include a long nose, drooping lip, hump at the shoulders and small tail. The flap of skin that hangs beneath the throat is called a BELL. Moose bulls weigh on average over 550 kg (1200 lbs) and females often more than 400 kg (900 lbs). New born moose calves weigh around 15 kg but quickly increase in size, around 300 or 400 pounds by its first winter. An Alaskan moose, one of the largest sub-group, discovered in 1897 holds the record for being the largest known modern deer. It was a bull standing 2.34 metres and weighed 816kg. Its RACK (or antler spread) was 199cm. The other end of the size scale is the smaller Shiras moose, also known as the 'Wyoming' or 'Yellowstone' moose. These animals are lighter in colour around the ears and back and have smaller hooves and antlers. Unlike other subspecies they are comfortable at higher elevations. Only bull moose have antlers, massive flattened ones averaging 160cm across and 20kg in weight. These antlers have as many as 30 TINES (or spikes), the shape differing from animal to animal. A young moose first pair of antlers grow from two tiny bumps on their head that they have had from birth. A bull of about a year old can be seen on the right with the first signs of antler growth visible. Mature bull moose shed their antlers once a year in November/December and replace them with new larger ones in the Spring. They are formed of living tissue supplied by blood through a network of vessels covered with a soft smooth skin called VELVET. Eventually the tissue solidifies, the velvet is scraped off and the antlers become completely formed of mineralised dead matter. Occassionally a moose population may grow too big and Wildlife experts have been studying the wolf/moose relationship at Isle Royale National Park, a wilderness island in the middle of Lake Superior on the border between Canada and America. These isolated moose populations provide an ideal natural laboratory for study without the influence of man. The moose population appeared on the island in the early 1900s and with the abscence of any predators the moose population continued to grow to a peak in the 1930s when there were over 5 moose per 100 hectares. Later in the early 1950s a group of wolf crossed the ice to the island and the population of moose began to decrease. Obviously the moose were in a weakened state due to the over population since a moose is a match for any wolf. Soon after the two populations existed in perfect equilibrium. Now each spring a scientist called Dr. Rolf Peterson publishes an annual report detailing the study of moose population levels and factors on Isle Royale which are effecting the habitat. Tree ring studies of forest trees, heavily browsed by moose, have revealed that tree growth in the regenerating forest declined in line with the moose increase. The question becomes, how many moose can the habitat support? Will the moose eat themselves out of a home.


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

It is estimated that in the 1800s there were as many as 6,000 grizzlies in Alberta. At the time they were mostly a prairie species. Clearly, it is unlikely that they will ever return to these numbers. Alberta’s grizzly bears are not a “population” as such. Alberta grizzly bears can move south to the US, west into BC, or north into the Northwest Territories, although this movement is thought to be limited and likely to become more so as disturbances continue. The possibility of bear-human encounters should not put anyone off enjoying all that the great Canadian outdoors has to offer as these encounters are rare, and as long as you are bear aware then both humans and bears should be able to share and enjoy the wilderness. Bears are omnivores which means, like humans, they eat animal and plant foods. The difference is however that bears are opportunistic and will eat almost anything, from toothpaste to cereal, your dinner to other wildlife. As bears are scavengers they will investigate and rummage through any potential food source.Living in bear country means that you need to be bear aware at all times, if you are then you minimise the chance that you will have a negative bear-human encounter.  A bear sow will typically accompany her cubs for 16 or 17 months. At the end of this period she will sever ties, forcing the youngsters to go off on their own. Female bear will reach their maximum size at six years, and boars continue to grow to a maximum size at 12 years of age. On average, most bear taken by hunters weigh somewhere between 125 and 300 pounds. Any black bear topping the 300-pound mark is considered large. Aside from body weight, black bear are judged by the size of their skull, with a Boone & Crockett minimum eligibility score of 21 inches and a Pope & Young score of 18 inches. We often hear of bear being territorial and, in a sense, this is true. While there exists a distinct hierarchy within the ranks of bear world, it is not uncommon to find many individuals residing in a given geographic area. Home ranges can span from two to 10 miles and resident bear populations will often hold a variety of boars, sows and cubs. Heavily timbered forests near agricultural lands often sustain good bear densities. With cereal crops such as oats, black bear favor the accessibility and abundance of such forage and often reside in proximity. As forest dwellers, black bear are omnivorous. Predominantly feeding on a variety of plants and berries throughout the summer, springtime offers a feast of dandelion and fresh grasses. Opportunists extraordinaire, black bear will also feed on carrion. Consistent with this and the fact that bear favor beavers as a staple food source in some regions, areas with spruce and poplar mixed forest and cascading beaver dams can be dynamite locations for the hunter to focus his/her attention. As with ungulate species, black bear undergo an annual rut cycle. Beginning in late May and continuing on through most of June, bear go in search of breeding partners. It is during this approximate six to eight week period that most large bear are taken by savvy hunters. Just as with members of the deer family, the larger, educated and otherwise reclusive bear become more visible as they readily cross roadways, clear-cuts and feed in open areas as they look for sows in estrus. Black bear den up in late October and drift into a state of torpor. This is not a true state of hibernation, but rather of slowed metabolism, during the cold winter months. In this suspended state, they cease to defecate, urinate or eat for the next 5-6 months. They do however periodically awaken from this sleep to stretch and walk around. Usually only a brief interlude, black bear soon return to the den to wait out the long winter. Sows will deliver and nurse their cubs in the den and as the snow begins to melt and spring arrives, they'll leave the den to begin their search for food. Bear meat brings mixed reviews. Some savor every morsel, and others grimace at the very mention of it. Its greasy, coarse texture and sweet flavor requires a certain kind of palate. A word of caution however, bear meat should be thoroughly cooked as it can carry a parasitic infection known as trichinella, a potentially dangerous disease to humans.Black bear have relatively poor eyesight, but an outstanding sense of smell and an uncanny hearing ability. When hunting black bear, consider food source. Focus on areas with a sufficient forage base. Once a general area is identified, begin your search by looking at trees. Bear claw marks on deciduous trees are the most obvious indicators. In mixed forest areas mature poplars wear the battle scars revealing claw marks of days gone by. While rarely do you stumble upon fresh markings, these lasting scars unveil a historical presence. Bear leave tracks. A great place to look for these is in the wet sand and soil along shorelines of rivers, streams and lakes. Most often at least one or two old or new bear tracks are found, keeping in mind that bears frequently use these movement corridors. A 5" or better bear pad/track can suggest a good bear is in the area. -A good set of binoculars is a must when spot and stalk bear hunting. Once spotted, the stalk begins. The regular rules apply - keep the wind in your face; remember bear rely heavily on their sense of smell. The best time to spot and stalk black bear is the five to 10 day window just prior to, or just as the deciduous trees begin to bud. With little food available in the woods, they can frequently be seen browsing on cut-lines and south-facing slopes where the first green grasses begin to sprout. Baiting bear is far from easy, and holds no guarantees! From time to time you get lucky and have one bear move in cautiously to inspect the provisions, but this is frequently more the exception than the rule. Perhaps the biggest advantage I see in baiting bearvis that, if and when a bear finally does come to the bait, it can allow the hunter time to assess size and stature. This is advantageous for the trophy hunter, allowing the option to pass up smaller bear, thus diminishing the odds of falling victim to ground shrink. Predator calling bear has come into its own in recent years. A myriad of videos and how-to articles are available to hunters looking for an alternative approach to hunting bear. I sometimes carry a Lohman wounded rabbit call for bear scenarios where calling might come in handy. While patience is required in this game of calling bear, it can take some time before a big old bear responds favorably. But when they do, be ready, because they're coming in for dinner!


Alberta Hunting Outfitters and Guide Wolf Facts

In Alberta, wolf are found in mountain, foothill and boreal regions. Wolf are not considered rare or endangered in the province. Historically, the gray wolf once included grasslands in Alberta, but its current habitat is restricted to forested areas. Wolves are social animals found in packs numbering from 2 to over 20. Pack size tends to be largest in winter. The wolf pack, a cohesive family-group, travels, hunts and rests together. Packs commonly include a pair of breeding adults and their pups, as well as yearlings or extra adults. Each pack lives and hunts in an exclusive territory established primarily by scent markings. Aggressive encounters with other packs are used to maintain territorial boundaries, if necessary. Gray wolf territories can range from 250 to 750 square kilometres (97 to 282 square miles). The wolf howl helps wolves communicate across long distances and also helps to establish pack territories. The wolf is the primeval wild dog, the largest wild canid, long a hunter alongside people, and ancestor of our most faithful domestic companion. Wolf vary widely in appearance. Their fur is thick and usually grey, but can vary from nearly pure white, red, or brown to black. Wolf lead a complex social life. They form groups called "packs," which are typically composed of a dominant mated pair ("The Alpha Pair"), their offspring, and an assortment of other adult wolf, often with some genetic relationship to the "first family." In May or June the dominant female wolf bears a litter of up to ten pups in a den in some secluded location. Life in summer centers around this den site, and later, a "rendez-vous" site. The whole wolf group assists in the upbringing, helping to feed the mother and young with prey from the hunt, acting as "nursemaids" when the mother wolf herself goes hunting, and guarding the area from predators like grizzly bear. By fall the wolf pups are able to roam freely and the group may become more nomadic. The life of the wolf pack is finely tuned to the hunt. When moose or caribou are abundant, wolf live in larger groups to enable pack hunting. A wolf pack uses a distinct territory, which it defends against other wolf. During winter wolf may travel long distances, especially when the main prey is a migratory species such as caribou. Many other foods will be utilized if available, such as moose, mountain sheep, marmots, ground squirrels, hares, mice and even spawning salmon. Wolf depend on large tracts of habitat and substantial populations of their principle prey species; moose, caribou and mountain sheep. All these are threatened by human population growth, development, habitat conversion and fragmentation and over-hunting. Wolf must also be protected from mechanized harassment, and even from disease and genetic alteration through breeding with dogs if they are to survive in the wild. It stands to reason that all human uses of wolf habitat must balance the needs of wolves and people. For instance, when wolf populations decline drastically because of low prey availability, human hunting of the prey stocks should be curtailed. On the other hand, temporarily reducing wolf populations might sometimes be desirable to allow depressed prey populations to rebound. Modern reindeer husbandry conflicts with healthy wolf populations. Consequently, populations of wolves are low in central Beringia. For example, in 1989 the number of wolf on the Seward Peninsula was estimated at only 50 to 150 individuals. In Chukotka recent decades have seen an official policy of shooting wolves from helicopters to protect reindeer herds, but there seems to be a shift away from this policy.
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