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Alaska Hunting Outfitters & Guides
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HUNTING


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Bear*Moose*Caribou*
Bison*Sheep*Goat*Wolf

KingFisher Perch
Joshua & Jaime Hughes
Box 112
Gakona, AK 99586
Ph 907-822 -5411
Ph 801-803-2574

 
Hunting is an important part of life for the KingFisher's Perch Family. We rely on moose, caribou, bear, and sheep meat to get us through the winters. If you are looking for a barren ground caribou or big horn sheep trip give us a call and we can recommend some outstanding outfitters. You will not only be able to view the Nelchina herd of caribou, but your chances of seeing Alaska’s other wildlife such as dall sheep, trophy bull moose will be enhanced. Your guided trip will start at our home base in Gakona, and will take you to mile 1 on the Denali Hwy. From there we will go about 35 miles. The Alaskan tundra of rolling hills extends right up to the mountains. The scene is picture perfect. In August and September the fall colors are breath taking. During September the Caribou cross the Denali tundra and dot the mountain side. This is a great time to see them.
 
Caribou*Bear*Moose
Alaska Wilderness Charters & Guiding
Brad Saalsaa
Box 9382
Ketchikan, AK 99901
Ph 907-247-4868

 
Alaska Wilderness Charters & Guiding offers world-class Alaska caribou hunting. Both our unguided caribou hunts and guided caribou hunts are based out of Kotzebue. Northwest Alaska is home to the largest herd of Barren Ground Caribou, called the Western Arctic Herd, with a population of 500,000 animals. Brown bear hunting is our passion. We are proud to offer our clients several different options for our Alaska brown bear hunts. Allowing our clients the best possible opportunity to harvest an Alaska brown bear. Based upon the client’s physical abilities, trophy expectations, and financial means, we are able to place them on a hunt that will surpass their expectations.
Bear*Moose*Sheep
Gateway Guiding & Outfitting
Mike and Shirley Vanning
2011 S. Steen
Veradale, WA 99037
Ph 509-844-2884
Ph 509-927-3469

 
Welcome to Gateway Guiding & Outfitting. We offer a wide variety of guided and unguided hunts in Alaska. Our mission is to provide high quality, fair chase hunts to the sportsman. It is our pledge to provide top quality camps, equipment, and hunting opportunities. Join us on the hunt of a lifetime for bear, moose and sheep.
Sheep*Caribou*Moose*Sheep
Bear*Wolf

Castle Rock Outfitters
Box 88
25 Otto Lake Road
Healy, Alaska 99743
Ph
907-683 1250

If you're looking for a real Alaskan big game hunting adventure, consider a hunt with Castle Rock Outfitters. We offer a wide selection of hunts in Alaska's wilderness areas that produce excellent big game trophies. They include dall sheep, grizzly bear, giant bull moose, wolf and caribou of Alaska's interior. Please compare my experience, fair-chase policy, comfortable camps and success rates with others. Experience the adventure, trophies and excitement of Alaska big game hunting the way it used to be...in areas with plenty of game ... where the guides care about your success. Our Dall Sheep hunting is conducted deep in the heart of the Alaska Range.

Bear*Sheep*Moose*Wolf
Westwind Guide Service
Box 298490
Wasilla, AK 99629
Ph 907-373-2047
 
Welcome to Alaska, home to some of the finest big game hunting in North America and the world. At Westwind Guide Service, you will experience one of the most dynamic and beautiful wilderness adventures of a lifetime. We have been in the guiding & outfitting business in Alaska for over 30 years. Our areas have produced many world record trophies. Yours could be next! Westwind Guide Service, owned and operated by Alaska Master Guide Tony Lee, specializes in brown bear, grizzly, moose, black bear and dall sheep.If you're dreaming of a Dall Sheep or Mountain Goat hunt in Alaska, we can make your dream a reality.
FISHING

KingFisher Perch
Joshua & Jaime Hughes
Box 112
Gakona, AK 99586
Ph 907-822 -5411
Ph 801-803-2574
Here you can find great information about our Alaska king salmon excursions, relaxing lodging and everything you need to know about our company and the guides that make us who we are. If you are looking for an Alaska  trip that will reconnect you to Mother Nature, recharge your batteries and give you the thrill of a lifetime, Kingfishers
Salmon*Halibut
Alaska Wilderness Charters & Guiding
Brad Saalsaa
Box 9382
Ketchikan, AK 99901
Ph 907-247-4868
 
Relax after a hard day of Alaska salmon and halibut in our spacious trophy room equipped with a wet bar. Enjoy hors deuvres while reminiscing about the day’s catch! Our Alaskan lodge accommodates up to 6 guests at a time, 2 per room. If your group size is a minimum of 4, you will have the lodge and boat to your selves.
Gateway Guiding & Outfitting
Mike and Shirley Vanning
2011 S. Steen
Veradale, WA 99037
           
Alaska is unsurpassed. We fish protected water, and there is an abundance of salmon and halibut. We are one of the first boats out in the morning and one of the last boats back to the dock at the end of the day.
Alaska Mountain & River Guides
Rob Roys
Box 220996
Anchorage, AK 99522
Ph 907-306-8909
 
AMR Guides leads wilderness trips for adventurers, eco-tourists. We journey to remote, wild places seldom visited by others. We are familiar with over 70 rivers and nearly every geographical region and mountain range in Alaska.
Travel Adventures-Chosen River
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Ph 585-360-1812
 
If you want to experience some of the best in the world, then you need to go here in Alaska. Here is a family owned business that specializes in remote wilderness base camps and float trips. Five camps in Alaska provide anglers the chance to experience incredible rivers in a wilderness setting with little or no pressure. 
Salmon
Travel Adventures-Copper River
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Ph 585-360-1812
 
From your arrival at the Copper River Lodge dock until your departure, you will enjoy an unrivaled standard of personal service. Flexibility is the key to any vacation, so if you want to sleep in and fish a little later, or see another stretch of river, your yearnings will never be far from reality.
Travel Adventures-Great Alaska Adventure Lodge
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Ph 585-360-1812
 
If there is a place in your mind's eye that can clearly picture the perfect Alaska- and you yearn for it- then come with us to Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. It is all here on the Kenai, exactly as you pictured it: hundreds of square miles of impossible beauty and bounty; a seemingly endless expanse of rolling forests, mountain meadows, hidden lakes.
Travel Adventures-Kodiak Island Steelhead
Jean Chaintreuil
125 Sully's Trail, Suite 1
Pittsford, NY 14534
Ph 585-360-1812
You have a unique opportunity to be one of only 36 guests per year to experience world-class steelhead on our special little river. Six guests per week in a remote wilderness steelhead tent camp for a guided adventure. Accessing is by chartered float planes allow for fishing and camping in areas where few others can.
RAFTING

Whitewater Rafting*Dory Boats
O.A.R.S
Box 67
Angels Camp, CA 9522
800-346-6277
209-736-4677
Fax 209-736-2902

  
While on a 1977 Tatshenshini River trip in Alaska, O.A.R.S. Founder and President George Wendt, witnessed a vastness even greater in magnitude than the Grand Canyon. It was a profound experience for him to travel approximately 150 miles through territory utterly untouched by human development.
Whitewater Rafting/Pontoon Rafting
KingFisher Perch
Joshua & Jaime Hughes
Box 112
Gakona, AK 99586
Ph 907-822 -5411
Ph 801-803-2574
We are proud to offer a great variety of Alaska rafting trips in what we believe is the most beautiful place on earth.  Frompeaceful float tours to whitewater rafting trips, our trips are the best way to explore a huge portion of this unseen, isolated land in Alaska.Our day rafting adventures offer everything from drama, fun whitewater, peaceful scenic views, and powerful vistas.
Whitewater Rafting
James Henry River Journeys
Box 807-WB
Bolinas, CA 94924
Ph 800-786-1830
Ph 415-868-1836
Fax 415-868-9033
  
We have found that rivers are like people and each has a unique character and personality. We invite you to explore with James Henry River Journeys, the pristine quality of Alaska's rivers: the magnificence of the Tatshenshini-Alsek Rivers and the haunting beauty of the Hulahula.
Whitewater Rafting
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Wayne and Gaia Marrs
Summer Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box MXY, McCarthy
Glennallen, AK 99588
Winter Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box Box 92129
Anchorage, AK 99509
Ph 888-933-5427
Ph 907-554-4445
Fax 888-933-5427
 If you want to get deep into the wilderness and travel many miles through the mountains but have only a week or two to do it, our river rafting adventures are made for you. The glacially fed rivers of Wrangell St. Elias National Park carry us to many places inaccessible by foot or any other means of transport.
Whitewater Rafting
Too-loo-uk River Guides
Box 106
Denali National Park, Alaska 99755
Ph 907-683-1542
Fax 907-683-1542


Ah, wilderness… Something deep within the soul is touched by the truly wild, unspoiled, untamed essence that is wilderness.  Some of the worlds most spectacular wild places are found in Alaska and nothing gets you out there like a river rafting trip in the remote corners of this vast state.
Whitewater Rafting*Kayaking
Copper Oar, LLC
Wayne and Gaia Marrs
Summer Address
Copper Oar
Box MXY, McCarthy
Glennallen, AK 99588
Winter Address
Copper Oar
Box Box 92129
Anchorage, AK 99509
Ph 888-933-5427
Ph 907-554-4445
Fax 888-933-5427
Copper Oar offers Alaska raft trips, multi-sport adventures and Alaska adventure tours in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and throughout the state. We specialize in rafing, hiking, kayaking and wildlife viewing in the remote wilderness of America's largest national park.
 
Float Trips*Kayaking
Alaska Mountain & River Guides
Rob Roys
Box 220996
Anchorage, AK 99522
Ph 907-306-8909
AMR Guides leads wilderness trips for adventurers, eco-tourists and fishermen. We journey to remote, wild places seldom visited by others. We are familiar with over 70 rivers and nearly every geographical region and mountain range in Alaska. And though the Great State of Alaska is our home, we can guide or outfit trips anywhere in the world.
BIKING

Alaska Outfitters
Alaska Outfitters
Alaska Outfitters
HIKING

Mountain Climbing
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Wayne and Gaia Marrs
Summer Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box MXY, McCarthy
Glennallen, AK 99588
Winter Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box Box 92129
Anchorage, AK 99509
Ph
888-933-5427
Ph 907-554-4445
Fax 888-933-5427
 
Backpacking in Alaska through pristine wilderness is like stepping back in time; to a place many people think only exists in our past. Our Alaska backpacking and hiking trips explore remote regions, some never before visited; where the land is young, the mountains still grumble upwards, glaciers actively sculpt the rock faces, and tundra grabs a tentative hold on new soil - this is quintessential Alaska. Our backpacking guides are professional and personable and will enthusiastically share their love and knowledge of this spectacular landscape with you. Backpack in Alaska with us for a fantastic adventure!
Hiking*Backpacking
Alaska Mountain & River Guides
Rob Roys
Box 220996
Anchorage, AK 99522
Ph 907-306-8909
AMR Guides leads wilderness trips for adventurers, eco-tourists and fishermen. We journey to remote, wild places seldom visited by others. We are familiar with over 70 rivers and nearly every geographical region and mountain range in Alaska. And though the Great State of Alaska is our home, we can guide or outfit trips anywhere in the world.
Alaska Outfitters
Alaska Outfitters
Alaska Outfitters

IceClimbing*Skiing*Ski Mountaineering
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Wayne and Gaia Marrs
Summer Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box MXY, McCarthy
Glennallen, AK 99588
Winter Address
St. Elias Alpine Guides
Box Box 92129
Anchorage, AK
Ph 888-933-5427
Ph 907-554-4445
Fax 888-933-5427

 
 

Alaska is the ultimate venue for ski exploration, and the ski plane is the ultimate approach vehicle. Our fly-in ski touring and ski mountaineering programs go to places that very few people, if any, have skied before. We have access to millions of acres of world class terrain in the Alaska Range and Wrangell-St Elias National Park. We offer trips for a range of abilities and experience levels, from scenic moderate glacier touring to legendary big mountain steep skiing.

Snowmobiling/Sledding
KingFisher Perch
Joshua & Jaime Hughes
Box 112
Gakona, AK 99586
Ph 907-822 -5411
Ph 801-803-2574
Our cabins provide continental breakfast,  small refrigerator, & microwave. Cabins do not have indoor plumbing, however we provide a five gallon water container and wash basin that gives a sense of the old Alaska. Scheduled use of the Lodge's shower is available.
   


Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Elk Facts

 Roosevelt elk in Alaska originated from a transplant of eight calves captured on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State in 1928 and moved to Afognak Island in 1929. Elk can now also be found on neighboring Raspberry Island. In Southeast Alaska, elk were transplanted to Etolin Island near Petersburg in 1986 and elk can now also be found on neighboring Zarembo Island. Fossil bones indicate that a subspecies of elk once existed in Interior Alaska during the Pleistocene period. Elk are members of the deer family. They are much larger than deer, but elk not as large as moose. Bull elk have antlers, which in prime bull elk are very large and sweep gracefully back over the shoulders with spikes pointing forward. Bull elk on Afognak Island are estimated to weigh up to 1,300 lbs (591 kg). Cow elk are similar in appearance to bulls, but they are smaller and lack antlers. A 1,300-lb (590-kg) elk will dress out at about 800 lbs (363 kg). Of this amount, about 450 lbs (204 kg) is usable meat. Elk are hardy animals whose large body size and herding tendencies require tremendous amounts of food. From late spring to early fall, with a wide variety of food available, elk are mainly grazers, using grasses, forbs, and other leafy vegetation. By late fall elk become browsers, feeding on sprouts and branches of shrubs and trees. Elk may supplement their diet at licks, where they take in minerals that may help them grow healthy coats and produce nutritious milk for the elk calves. An elk stomach has four chambers: the first stores food, and the other three digest it. An elk top two canine teeth are called ivories. Scientists believe ivories are remnants of saber-like tusks that ancestral species of elk used in combat Most hunters save ivories as a memento of the elk hunt. Only male elk have antlers, Bull elk shed and grow a new set of antlers every year.New elk antlers are covered in fuzzy skin called velvet and Antlers harden by late summer and the velvet peels away. By September, elk antlers are solid bone. A set of elk antlers on a mature bull elk can weigh up to 40 pounds. When alarmed, elk raise their heads high, open their eyes wide, move stiffly and rotate their ears to listen. If a harem cow wanders, a bull elk stretches his neck out low, tips up his nose, tilts his antlers back and circles her. Elk threaten each other by curling back their upper lip, grinding their teeth and hissing softly. Agitated elk hold their heads high, lay their ears back and flare their nostrils, and sometimes even punch with their front hooves. Elk also use body language. For example, an elk displays dominance by raising its head high.  Elk breed in the fall and Bull elk gather cows and calves into small groups called harems. Bull elk wallow in mud to coat themselves with urine "perfume" to attract cows. Today, about one million elk live in the western United States, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina, and from Ontario west in Canada. Elk habitat consists of  food, water, shelter and space are essential to elk survival. Elk live in a variety of habitats, from rainforests to alpine meadows and dry desert valleys to hardwood forests.


Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Bear Facts

Alaska so special is that all three species of North American bear flourish here. There is a chance that you may be lucky enough to see a bear. But even if you don't, you will never be far from one, because Alaska is bear country. Brown/grizzly bear are found from the islands of southeastern Alaska to the arctic. Black bear inhabit most of Alaska's forests. Polar bear frequent the pack ice and tundra of extreme northern and western Alaska. Bear are curious, intelligent and potentially dangerous animals, but undue fear of bear can endanger both bear and people. Many bear are killed each year by people who are afraid of them. Respecting bears and learning proper behavior in their territory will help so that if you encounter a bear, neither of you will suffer needlessly from the experience. Most bear tend to avoid people. In most cases, if you give a bear the opportunity to do the right thing, it will. Many bear live in Alaska and many people enjoy the outdoors, but surprisingly few people even see bear. Only a tiny percentage of those few are ever threatened by a bear. A study by the state epidemiologist showed that during the first 85 years of this century, only 20 people died in bear attacks in Alaska. In the 10 years 1975-85, 19 people in Alaska were killed by dogs. If you are hiking through bear country, make your presence known — especially where the terrain or vegetation makes it hard to see. Make noise, sing, talk loudly or tie a bell to your pack. If possible, travel with a group. Groups are noisier and easier for bear to detect. Avoid thick brush. If you can't, try to walk with the wind at your back so your scent will warn bear of your presence. Contrary to popular belief, bear can see almost as well as people, but trust their noses much more than their eyes or ears. Always let bear know you are there. Bear, like humans, use trails and roads. Don't set up camp close to a trail bear might use. Detour around areas where you see or smell carcasses of fish or animals, or see scavengers congregated. A bear's food may be there and if the bear is nearby, it may defend the cache aggressively. There are 8 species of bear in the world right now. In the next 20—30 years, the fate of most of those species will be decided. Some people would be fine eradicating bear in the wild to accommodate human settlement—some states have even organized bear hunts. But bear are as important to the balance of nature as sheep or salmon. It's up to those of us who care for bear to look out for their survival.


Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Caribou Facts

Alaska has almost twice as many caribou as people? Alaska's human population numbers around 600,000, while there are over one million caribou in the state. And the government doesn't even pay them to live here! The largest caribou herd is the Western Arctic herd with almost half the total caribou in Alaska. Other big caribou herds are the Porcupine and the Mulchatna herds. There are twenty-eight smaller wild herds ranging from the North Slope to the Canadian border northeast of Tok, and a few herds of domesticated caribou—or reindeer—on the Seward Peninsula. Caribou are almost constantly on the move? Some caribou migrate more than 3,000 miles each year—farther than any other land animal. They travel in herds every fall and spring from their wintering to their calving grounds, and arrive just in time to think about heading back. Biologists have counted more than 640,000 of these northern caribou in July, spread out across Alaska's North Slope. Caribou are built to travel. Their large, concave hooves hold them up like snowshoes—both on winter snow and on the soggy summer tundra. In water, those hooves become enormous paddles. Caribou can swim across fast-flowing rivers and large lakes with ease. The hollow hairs of their coat help keep them afloat. A caribou in a hurry can run 50 miles per hour. But you could hardly hurry a caribou when he's only hurrying from where he's headed to. Like most herd animals, the caribou must keep moving to find adequate food. Large caribou herds often migrate long distances (up to 400 miles/640 km) between summer and winter ranges. Smaller caribou herds may not migrate at all. In summer (May-September), caribou eat the leaves of willows, sedges, flowering tundra plants, and mushrooms. They switch to lichens (reindeer moss), dried sedges (grasslike plants), and small shrubs (like blueberry) in September. Caribou prefer treeless tundra and mountains during all seasons, but many caribou herds winter in the boreal forest (taiga). Calving areas are usually located in mountains or on open, coastal tundra. Caribou tend to calve in the same general areas year after year, but migration routes used for many years may suddenly be abandoned in favor of movements to new areas with more food. Changing movements can create problems for the Native people in Alaska and Canada who depend upon caribou for food. Caribou movements are probably triggered by changing weather conditions, such as the onset of cold weather or snowstorms. Once they decide to migrate, caribou can travel up to 50 miles a day. Caribou apparently have a built in compass, Approximately 900,000 wild caribou in Alaska. Caribou are somewhat cyclic in number, but the timing of declines and increases, and the size to which caribou herds grow is not very predictable. Although overhunting caused some caribou herds to remain low in the past, today, varying weather patterns (climate), population density, predation by wolves and grizzly bears, and disease outbreaks determine whether most caribou herds increase or decrease. Caribou have not been adversely affected by human activities in Alaska. Pipelines and most other developments are built to allow for caribou movements, and caribou have shown us that they can adapt to the presence of people and machines. As human activities expand in Alaska, the great challenge for caribou management is for man to consider the needs of our caribou herds and ensure that they remain a visible, healthy part of our landscape.


Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Moose Facts

Moose, the world’s largest member of the deer family, are a common animal in Alaska. These large moose are prized as a valuable game species, and for wildlife viewing. While not normally aggressive, moose can become dangerous to people when they are hungry, tired of walking in deep snow, or harassed by people, dogs and traffic. Vehicle-moose collisions pose the greatest danger to both people and moose; Alaska has the highest rate of moose-vehicle collisions in the world. The most important safety precautions are to slow down while driving and to always give moose plenty of space; never approach a moose. It is also illegal – and dangerous – to feed moose. Moose sometimes also cause problems when they eat landscaping or crops. Despite these nuisances, moose are considered by many to be a symbol of life in Alaska. People and moose in Alaska have been neighbors for thousands of years. Both humans and moose prefer the same low-lying habitat adjacent to rivers and streams, causing them to come into frequent contact. Moose can be found in Alaska from the Unuk River in the Southeast Panhandle to the Colville River on the Arctic Slope, a span that includes many large Alaskan communities and numerous villages. The key to coexisting with moose is to avoid confrontations by giving moose plenty of space. Never approach a moose! Moose-vehicle collisions are the biggest way people get hurt by moose. Secondarily, people can be hurt when moose charge, stomp and kick to protect themselves. While moose are generally perceived to be less dangerous than bears, more people are actually injured each year in Alaska by moose than bears. Normally, moose will flee when they feel threatened but under certain circumstances, they can become aggressive. Understanding a moose’s body language, and the things that moose do when they are stressed, can help you stay safe. It is also wise to take precautions when driving in moose country, especially in winter when vehicle-moose collisions are most common.Do you know what to do when a moose charges? Fortunately most moose charges are bluffs – warnings for you to get back. But if a moose does charge, don’t wait to find out if it’s bluffing. Run or walk quickly and get behind something solid, like a tree, or retreat to a safe place, like inside a building or car. Alaska , residents' trash has increasingly become moose treasure. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game recently reported that the moose activity of nosing through abandoned cuisine has steadily escalated in the past 15 years. March and April are the worst months because the winter food supply in the wild grows scarce and hungry moose lumber into the city in higher numbers. So what's the harm in a little garbage grazing? Like humans, moose often turn grumpy when hungry, and if there isn't any food around when they come looking, the moose are more likely to lash out at someone. 

Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Sheep Facts


It takes a Dall Sheep about eight years to grow the majestic, circular horns that are the trademark of this species? And that these sheep horns are made of keratin, the same substance as fingernails? These all-white sheep live their short lives on alpine ridges and meadows, and on steep, craggy slopes. When Dall sheep sense danger they flock to rocks and crags to elude predators. The females—or ewes—give birth on these steep slopes in May and June. Lambs are sure-footed just hours after being born. In winter, Dall sheep paw through snow on wind-blown slopes to browse on dry, frozen grasses and sedges. To balance their diet, these hardy sheep travel long distances to eat dirt at "licks," sites rich in minerals. Dall Sheep inhabit the mountain ranges of Alaska. These white creatures are most notable for the males’ massive curled horns. Females also carry horns, but theirs are shorter and more slender, and only slightly curved. Until sheep reach the age of 3 years, they tend to resemble the ewes quite a bit. After that, continued horn growth makes the males easily recognizable. Horns grow steadily during spring, summer, and early fall. In late fall or winter, horn growth slows and eventually ceases. This start-and-stop growth results in a pattern of rings called annuli which are spaced along the length of the sheep horn, and can help determine age. Dall sheep as old as 16 years have been seen, and ewes have been known to reach 19 years of age. Generally, however, a 12 year old sheep is considered quite old. The adult sheep live in bands which seldom associate with ewe groups beyond the mating season in late November and early December. The sheep horn clashing that rams are so well known for doesn’t result from fights over possession of ewes, but is a means of establishing order. These clashes occur throughout the year on an occasional basis, but occur more frequently just before the rut when rams are moving among the ewes and meet unfamiliar rams of similar horn size. Sheep can sire offspring at 18 months of age, but normally do not breed successfully until they approach dominance rank (at full curl age and size). The diets of Dall sheep vary from range to range. During summer, food is abundant, and a wide variety of plants is consumed. Winter sheep diet is much more limited and consists primarily of dry, frozen grass and sedge stems available when snow is blown off the winter ranges. Some sheep populations use significant amounts of lichen and moss during winter. Many Dall sheep populations visit mineral licks during the spring and often travel many miles to eat the soil at these unusual geological formations. As several different bands of sheep meet at mineral licks, ram and ewe groups may mingle and young rams join the sheep band which happens to be present at the time. This random contribution of young sheep to different sheep bands may benefit sheep by maintaining genetic diversity. Sheep are very loyal to their home ranges. Mineral licks are good spots to observe sheep because the animals are so intent on eating the dirt they pay little attention to humans. However, major disturbances such as low-flying aircraft or operating machinery readily drive sheep from the mineral licks.

Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Goat Facts

Mountain goat occupy remote habitat in North America and were not described in the scientific literature until 1816. They are one of the least-studied large mammals in North America. The goat are sometimes confused with Dall sheep, but sheep are not found in Southeast Alaska and prefer drier country. The mountain goat is the single North American representative of a unique group of mountain ungulates called the Rupicaprinae, or “rock goat.” They are characterized by having relatively short horns and a fondness for living in rugged terrain. Mountain goat are one of two species of all-white, hoofed, large mammals found in Alaska. Mountain goat are easily distinguishable by their black horns. These creatures are well adapted for extreme winter conditions and have a long, shaggy winter coat. A crest of long, erect hair up to eight or more inches in length runs along the spine, on the rump, and over the shoulders and neck. Long hairs on the legs give the appearance that the goat is wearing pantaloons. Mountain goat begin shedding their winter coat in June, with adult male goat and sub-adults shedding-out before females. By July, their soft, sleek summer coat is grown in. When the first winter snows dust the high country in mid-October, mountain goat have fully grown their winter coats again. The appearance of both sexes is much alike except that male goat are about 40% larger than females and have differently shaped horns. Adult female goat weigh about 180 pounds, with males weighing 260 to 350 pounds. The horns of an average adult female goat are equal in length to those of an average adult male but are more slender and bend back more sharply at the tip. Mountain goat hooves are specially designed for climbing in steep, rock, and slippery terrain. A close-up look reveals a hard keratinous sheath and a soft embedded pad that enable goat to gain purchase on the smallest of granite cracks while simultaneously gripping maximum surface area. The breeding season for mountain goat occurs between late October and early December. Male goat may travel considerable distances in search of receptive females (nannies). Mountain goat have a polygynous mating systems, meaning that males will breed with multiple females but not vice versa. Typically, prime-aged males (5-10 years old) do most of the breeding, with some battling among males causing occasional puncture wounds. Adult male goat usually separate themselves from the larger group except for during the rut. They may form small bachelor groups, especially in summer. Female goat, on the other hand, tend to stay in groups along with kids and immature animals. This behavior is particularly evident during mid-summer when large nursery bands form. Mountain goat are both grazing and browsing animals depending on the particular habitat and season of the year. They normally summer in high alpine meadows where they graze on grasses, herbs, and low-growing shrubs. As winter advances, feeding habits generally shift to browsing. Blueberry, hemlock, and lichen can be important winter diet items, but feeding habits in winter center on availability. Mountain goat occupy remote habitat and are therefore the least studied large mammal in North America. The mountain goat range is restricted to the steep and broken mountain ranges of northwestern North America, from the northern Cascade and Rocky mountains to Southcentral Alaska. In Alaska, mountain goat occur throughout the southeast Panhandle with their range continuing north and west along the coastal mountains to Cook Inlet. In Southcentral Alaska goat are generally confined to the Chugach and Wrangell mountains, although small numbers of goat have been documented in the Talkeetna Mountains. Mountain goat have also been introduced to non-native range on Kodiak and Baranof Islands where populations have expanded, on Chichagof Island where the transplant apparently failed, and most recently on Revillagigedo Island where goat are now firmly established. Goat in coastal areas exhibit altitudinal migrations from alpine summer ranges to winter ranges at or below tree line, typically in old-growth forest habitats. In more interior areas, mountain goat will winter on windswept ridges as long as forage areas remain uncovered by snow. Based on latest reporting period data, mountain goat populations are generally stable throughout most of the range, increasing and expanding their range on south Kodiak and Baranof Island, but declining on the Kenai Peninsula because of high female goat harvest. The population is thought to be chronically low in portions of the Talkeetna Mountains (14A & B) because habitat may be marginal for goat.
Annual differences in survey coverage and uncertainties about the sightability of goat during aerial surveys make it difficult to estimate abundance. The effects of severe winters on goat populations are poorly understood.


Alaska Hunting Outfitters and Guides Wolf Facts

Wolf are members of the family Canidae. Early taxonomists recognized about 24 New World and eight Old World subspecies of Canis lupus, with four subspecies thought to occur in Alaska. Recent studies of wolf skull characteristics, body size, and color suggest that differences are slight with considerable overlap in the characteristics of wolf from various areas. Only two Alaska subspecies are now recognized. Wolf in Southeast Alaska tend to be darker and somewhat smaller than those in northern parts of the state. The pelt color of Alaska wolf ranges from black to nearly white, with every shade of gray and tan in between. Gray or black wolf are most common, and the relative abundance of each color phase varies over time and from place to place. Most adult male wolf in Interior Alaska weigh from 85 to 115 pounds (38.6-52.3), but they occasionally reach 145 pounds (65.3 kg). Females average 10 to 15 pounds (2-5 kg) lighter than males and rarely weigh more than 110 pounds (50 kg). Wolf reach adult size by about 1 year of age. Wolf are social animals and usually live in packs that include parents and pups of the year. The average pack size is six or seven animals, and pack members often include some yearlings and other adults. Packs of 20 to 30 wolf sometimes occur, and these larger packs may have two or three litters of pups from more than one female. The social order in the pack is characterized by a separate dominance hierarchy among females and males. In most areas wolf packs tend to remain within a territory used almost exclusively by pack members, with only occasional overlap in the ranges of neighboring wolf packs. Despite a generally high birth rate, wolves rarely become abundant because mortality is also high. In much of Alaska, the major sources of mortality are: predation by other wolf; hunting; and trapping. Diseases, malnutrition, and accidents also help regulate wolf numbers. Predation by other wolf is a major cause of death because wolf defend their territories from other wolves. Dispersing wolf (e.g., young adults) are common but they typically find little suitable habitat that is not already occupied by other wolf. Typically one female wolf in a pack has a litter of about seven pups each year. This varies, in some wolf packs more than one female may bring off a litter. Packs of 20 to 30 wolf sometimes occur, and these larger packs may have two or three litters of pups from more than one female. In some cases a pair of wolf may not form a pack or belong to a pack, and will bring off a litter of pups. Wolf are carnivores, and in most of mainland Alaska moose and/or caribou are their primary food, with Dall sheep, squirrels, snowshoe hares, beaver, and occasionally birds and fish as supplements in the diet. The rate at which wolf kill large mammals varies with prey availability and environmental conditions. A wolf pack may kill a deer or moose every few days during the winter. At other times, they may go for several days with almost no food. Since wolf are opportunistic, young, old, or debilitated animals are preyed upon more heavily than healthy middle-age animals. Under some circumstances, however, such as when snow is unusually deep or prey is scarce, even animals in their prime may be vulnerable to wolf. The wolf occurs throughout mainland Alaska, on Unimak Island in the Aleutians, and on all of the major islands in Southeast except Admiralty, Baranof, and Chichagof. The wolf range includes about 85 percent of Alaska's 586,000 square-mile area. Wolf are adaptable and exist in a wide variety of habitats extending from the rain forests of the Southeast Panhandle to the arctic tundra along the Beaufort Sea. Alaska is home to an estimated 7,000 to 11,000 wolf. Wolf have never been threatened or endangered in Alaska. They are found in nearly all of their historic range, excepting the center of urban areas, although they are found on the outskirts of Anchorage, Fairbanks and Juneau. Wolves are common over much of the state. The highest densities of wolf occur in Southeast Alaska, where Sitka black-tailed deer serve as the major food source for wolf. Wolf densities are lowest in the coastal portions of western and northern Alaska. Although the distribution of wolves has remained relatively constant in recent times, their abundance is influenced by harvest levels, diseases, and prey availability
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